KamerTunesBlog

Revisiting my extensive music collection, one artist at a time

Forty Year Friday – MEAT LOAF “BAT OUT OF HELL”

Artist: MEAT LOAF
Album: BAT OUT OF HELL

[Welcome to Forty Year Friday, the weekly series on my favorite albums of 1977]

meat-loaf-bat-out-of-hellThere has never been a more unlikely hit record than Meat Loaf’s mega-platinum Bat Out Of Hell. With the beautiful bellowing voice of the behemoth formerly known as Marvin Lee Aday (actor, stage performer and one-time Ted Nugent vocalist) and the over-the-top songwriting of Jim Steinman, numerous record companies turned them down throughout 1975 & 1976 before Epic Records subsidiary Cleveland International took a chance on the duo. Production & arrangements were handled by the multi-talented Todd Rundgren, who surrounded Meat & Steinman with world class musicians like saxophonist Edgar Winter, E Street Band members Roy Bittan (piano) & Max Weinberg (drums) and Rundgren’s Utopia bandmates Kasim Sulton (bass), John “Willie” Wilcox (drums) & Roger Powell (synths). Bat Out Of Hell features only seven songs, three of which clock in between 8 & 10 minutes, showcasing Steinman’s love of Phil Spector’s “Wall Of Sound” recordings, ‘60s girls groups (specifically teenage “tragedy” records like The Shangri-La’s “Leader Of The Pack”) and bombastic, operatic showtunes. Paired with lyrics that are often aimed at the sex-obsessed minds of teenage boys, and an overall sound that owes a huge debt to Bruce Springsteen’s Born To Run, it’s hard to believe anyone gave this project a chance and equally surprising at how successful it became; a record out-of-time that became timeless as a result.

Four songs that would either crack the Top 40 or become FM radio staples form the core of this unique album. “You Took The Words Right Out Of My Mouth (Hot Summer Night)” was the first single and an ideal choice to introduce Meat Loaf to the world. Following a dramatic spoken-word intro from Steinman & actress Marcia McClain (“On a hot summer night, would you offer your throat to the wolf with the red roses?), we get a hybrid of Springsteen, Motown and the aforementioned “wall of sound,” with hand claps, sleigh bells and soaring backing vocals courtesy of Rundren & singer/actress Ellen Foley. Although not the highest charting single, meat-loaf-with-karla-devito-1977“Paradise By The Dashboard Light” has become Meat Loaf’s signature song. With three distinct sections (“Glowing like the metal on the edge of a knife/We were barely seventeen & we were barely dressed”; “Do you love me, will you love me forever/Let me sleep on it”; “Praying for the end of time”) punctuated by the funky middle section with famed Yankees broadcaster Phil Rizzuto delivering the play-by-play of Meat and his lady going (almost) all the way, there’s really nothing else like it in the history of popular music. The stunning ballad “Two Out Of Three Ain’t Bad” has long been one of my two favorite Meat Loaf songs, a straightforward declaration of lust that could almost work as a love song if you ignore the lyrics (“I want you, I need you, but there ain’t no way I’m ever gonna love you…”). I especially love his tender vocal performance on this one. The nearly 10-minute album opener “Bat Out Of Hell” is my other favorite track, appealing to my progressive rock side with its flashy musicianship, various tempo & tonal shifts and vivid imagery (like this opening verse: “The sirens are screaming and the fires are howling way down in the valley tonight, There’s a man in the shadows with a gun in his eye and a blade shining oh so bright, There’s evil in the air and there’s thunder in sky and a killer’s on the bloodshot streets, Oh and down in the tunnel where the deadly are rising, oh, I swear I saw a young boy down in the gutter, he was starting to foam in the heat”). If you put equal parts Styx, Queen, Rundgren’s Utopia and Springsteen’s “Jungleland” into a blender, this mammoth track would be the result.

meat-loaf-and-jim-steinman-1977The stomping, old-time rock ‘n’ roll of “All Revved Up And No Place To Go” got a lot of radio play in the late-‘70s but I think it’s been largely overlooked since then in favor of the songs discussed above. It’s a sax-fueled tour-de-force for Edgar Winter, and I’ve always enjoyed the shift to double-time tempo in the final minute. This must have been a highlight of his theatrical live performances. Two wonderful ballads round out the album. “Heaven Can Wait” is a string-laden spiritual and “For Crying Out Loud” closes out the record in grand style, with orchestral accompaniment following an extended piano-and-vocal intro. Bat Out Of Hell might be one of those you-had-to-be-there albums, so I have no idea how it would sound to someone hearing it for the first time all these years later, but whenever I play it I’m immediately transported back to my adolescence and it always makes me smile. It also has one of the most iconic album covers of all time.

 

Advertisements

82 comments on “Forty Year Friday – MEAT LOAF “BAT OUT OF HELL”

  1. Aphoristical
    February 17, 2017

    I heard it for the first time recently, since it was on a plane’s playlist and it was a good change to check it out. I wasn’t super impressed, but I’m enough of a Rundgren and Springsteen fan that I should give it another chance.

    Like

    • It’s hard to imagine how this album would come across to someone hearing it for the first time 40 yeas after its release, but I’m not surprised it didn’t make an impact on you. As I wrote in the post, this might be one of those you-had-to-be-there albums. I’m glad I was. 😀 Please let me know if your opinion ever changes based on subsequent listens.

      Like

  2. 80smetalman
    February 17, 2017

    Good write up! I read somewhere that Phil Rizzuto said after that if he had known that his baseball commentating on “Paradise” was a sexual innuendo, he wouldn’t have done it. This is a classic album.

    Like

  3. stephen1001
    February 17, 2017

    Nice review Rich – and absolutely, Paradise is really one-of-a-kind!

    Like

  4. Bill Van Orden
    February 17, 2017

    Great write up and insights as always, Rich…. you are dead on right about the ‘HAD TO BE THERE” aspect. I have the same reaction when listening to Boston, Steely Dan, and early Aerosmith…. takes me back instantly to the time period, but only focusing on the GOOD aspects of my time, rather than turmoil that the 70’s had.

    Like

    • Thanks, Bill. I assume you’re not saying that those other bands fall under the “you had to be there” banner, right? I love the mental time-travel aspect of so much of that music, but I’m especially amazed at how well most of the great albums/songs from that decade have held up. They’re timeless. For me Bat Out Of Hell is timeless, but maybe a millennial would feel differently.

      Like

  5. Kevin
    February 17, 2017

    Hearing this on the radio so many times as a kid, I never felt any need to buy it. Listening to the title track today for the first time, your Styx/Queen/Utopia/”Jungleland” comparison is spot on.

    Like

    • Thanks, Kevin. I can understand someone not needing to hear “Paradise By The Dashboard Light” or “Two Out Of Three Ain’t Bad” again after too much exposure to them in their early years, but they are unique songs that hold up extremely well for me. I’m glad you agree with my description of the title track, which is a monumental piece. Thanks for checking it out for the first time. I’m guessing you still don’t feel the urge to buy the album, right?

      Like

      • Kevin
        February 17, 2017

        Ha! Yeah, I don’t think I’ll be running out to buy it anytime soon, but I am glad I heard that song. It’s pretty great, but my plate has no room for Meat Loaf right now.

        Like

      • Well-played, sir. Even a small serving of Meat Loaf can be quite filling. Instead, have a cheeseburger in paradise with some green onions, custard pie with brown sugar and eat a peach. 😛

        Like

  6. mikeladano
    February 17, 2017

    Not an artist I’m super familiar with. I’d like to add Bat 1 and even 2 to my collection. Nice writeup.

    Like

    • Thanks, Mike. I only own one other Meat Loaf album (the huge-step-down follow-up, Dead Ringer). By the time Bat 2 was released I had lost interest completely, although I might have to check it out on Spotify soon to see if I missed something there. I can’t imagine you wouldn’t love the title track to this album, so check out the clip embedded in the post if you have 10 minutes to spare).

      Like

  7. Alyson
    February 17, 2017

    You say above – “A record out-of-time that became timeless as a result” which sums it up exactly. As you’ll have gathered I wasn’t particularly a fan of rock music back in ’77 but this was something just so much more and (I’ve just checked) it stayed in our UK Album Chart for 474 weeks (nearly 10 years).

    Mr Loaf would have probably become a household name whatever path he’d chosen as he was just one of those larger than life characters that don’t come along very often. For the record I think my favourite from the 3 songs featured above is You Took The Words….. – Classic intro!

    Like

    • So were/are you a fan of this album, Alyson, or were you just noting that it was a major hit on your side of the pond? I agree with your assessment of Meat being a larger-than-life (in more ways than one) character who was bound to be famous. As for your compliment about the classic intro to “You Took The Words Right Out Of My Mouth,” I’m sure Mr. Steinman’s response would be, “I bet you say that to all the boys.” 😀

      Like

      • Alyson
        February 18, 2017

        Sorry thought I’d made it clear – Of course I was a fan which was unusual for me as not really my genre of choice back then but as you said “out-of-time and timeless”.

        As for Steinman’s response, yes very funny but just for the record no I don’t – Got to be a real classic!!

        Like

      • I had a feeling that’s what you meant but I wanted to be sure. I was curious if Bat Out Of Hell translated outside of the US, so I’m happy to find out that was the case. Thanks fr clarifying that you don’t, in fact, say that to all the boys. 😀

        Liked by 1 person

  8. keepsmealive
    February 17, 2017

    40 years for this one? Holy crap.

    Like

  9. Vinyl Connection
    February 18, 2017

    Sold a few of these in the Record Store at the time (as you might imagine). He was so famous downunder that Mr Loaf was invited to do the pre-match entertainment at the AFL Grand Final a few years back (that’s our Superbowl). He was utterly awful. Out of tune and not even aware that he’d become a parody of himself. Kinda sad.
    But I do hope his health has improved after last year’s crises.

    Like

    • What years were you working at the record store, Bruce? When I worked in record retail from ’83 to ’88 this album had mostly been forgotten, until it was reissued on CD. Perhaps his popularity down under lasted longer than it did in his home country. I’m not surprised that he sounded awful at your Super Bowl. I know he’s had voice problems over the years and, even if that wasn’t the case, age is probably catching up to him. He’s always seemed like a good guy and I agree that I hope he stays healthy.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Vinyl Connection
        February 19, 2017

        A bit before that, Rich. 1973 – 80, much of it part-time.

        Like

      • I thought you were only a few years older than me. Were you working at record stores when you were 9? Haha. I’m not surprised you sold a whole lot of Bat Out Of Hell LPs back then.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Vinyl Connection
        February 20, 2017

        We did sell a bunch, for sure. But not nearly as many as ‘Hot August Night’. As my Uncle Methuselah said, ‘That was some hit record, that’.

        Like

      • Haha, that’s great, Bruce. I only own two Neil Diamond discs: Hot August Night on vinyl (which I bought used sometime in the ’90s) and a CD compilation I made from a friend’s box set that he called Neil F**kin’ Diamond. It’s got just about every ND song any casual fan would want to hear.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Vinyl Connection
        February 20, 2017

        Why didn’t the company name an official comp that? Could netted a whole new demographic!

        Like

      • Exactly. My friend who lent me the box set is a graphic designer, so he even created cover art with that title.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Phillip Helbig
        February 21, 2017

        “It’s got just about every ND song any casual fan would want to hear.”

        Somehow, I imagine that all Neil Diamond fans are casual. 🙂

        Like

      • There are tons of devoted Neil Diamond fanatics out there. I saw him once at Madison Square Garden and you can tell that some people are as into him as you are into Jethro Tull, Iron Maiden, etc.

        Like

    • Phillip Helbig
      February 22, 2017

      “There are tons of devoted Neil Diamond fanatics out there. I saw him once at Madison Square Garden and you can tell that some people are as into him as you are into Jethro Tull, Iron Maiden, etc.”

      Maybe you missed my joke; “casual” here refers to a style of dress. Remember that Neil Diamond did a lot to make the jumpsuit acceptable evening wear. 🙂

      Like

  10. Victim of the Fury
    February 18, 2017

    Never bought this at the time nor since, but have always “respected” it. I will never forget Meatloaf’s (etched in my mind as) unhinged, sweat-soaked, and utterly stunning performance of “All Revved Up…” on Saturday Night Live in March ’78. Not to mention the glory of Eddie’s “Hot Patootie” in Rocky Horror and the fact that his vocals on Nugent’s Free For All — especially on the song “Writing on the Wall” — were stellar. Based on all of that ’75-’78 excellence, he gets a pass from me for the lesser stuff that came later.

    Like

    • I had forgotten about his SNL appearance. Yep, that was eye-catching for sure. By then I already loved the album so I was thrilled to see him perform a couple of songs live. I never really got into Rocky Horror even though I worked at a movie theater from ’82-’83 which showed it every week at midnight. For me it was too silly & campy, but I enjoyed seeing Meat a few years before he became famous. As for his work with Nugent, I wasn’t aware of it until a few years ago. I was listening to a Nuge compilation and that unmistakable voice appeared. That’s when I discovered he sang on a few Nuge songs on Free-For-All.

      Like

  11. Murphy's Law
    February 18, 2017

    You hear the phrase “rock opera” thrown around a lot, but this is truly rock opera. It’s so over the top that it’s almost beyond criticism. I like it, but I can only listen to 1 or 2 songs at a time; It’s almost overwhelming.

    Like

    • I guess the only things keeping this from being a true rock opera are the lack of a recurring theme and a cohesive story. That’s why I’ve always thought of it as “operatic rock” rather than “rock opera.” But that’s just me being technical. It’s certainly one of the more audacious, over-the-top hit albums ever released. I can see why you can only handle one or two songs at a time. The title track can be exhausting.

      Like

  12. galley99
    February 18, 2017

    My uncle Jon turned me on to Meat Loaf in 1977, and have been a fan ever since. I never stopped buying his albums, even through the lean years of the ’80s. Of course, that just set him up for the greatest comeback in rock and roll history. From being virtually out of the music business, to having a number one song and an album which has sold nearly 15 million copies!

    Like

    • Are there any Meat albums you like as much as Bat Out Of Hell? I excitedly bought Dead Ringer when it was released and was massively disappointed (and I’ve felt the same way each time I’ve revisited it in the hopes that my opinion will change), and I heard Blind Before I Stop when I worked at Atlantic Records which didn’t make much of an impact on me. I also played a few songs from his new album recently and I could barely tell it was Meat Loaf. I’m wondering if I’ve missed out on a classic within his discography. I added Bat Out Of Hell II to my Spotify account. I never liked the hit singles when the album was released but maybe I’ll feel differently nearly a quarter of a century later. I plan on playing it this week.

      Like

      • galley99
        February 20, 2017

        Dead Ringer would’ve been great if Meat hadn’t had the vocal problems. I think Bat Out Of Hell III: The Monster Is Loose is incredible!

        Braver Than We Are should’ve never been released. Meat’s voice is absolutely shot!

        Like

      • Based on your recommendation I will check out the 3rd Bat Out Of Hell album (along with #2). Having heard some of Braver Than We Are recently, I’m glad you agree that he doesn’t sound good. I wasn’t sure if I was missing something. Of course it’s not a criticism of him, since most singers lose their range as they age, but his voice was such a thing of beauty and it’s hard not to feel bad for him. Some singers can compensate by trying a different style of music or writing some killer songs, but he’s at the mercy of his collaborators.

        Like

  13. Phillip Helbig
    February 20, 2017

    “I never really got into Rocky Horror even though I worked at a movie theater from ’82-’83 which showed it every week at midnight. For me it was too silly & campy,”

    I do appreciate good camp, such as the Batman television series starring Adam West and Burt Ward. (Interestingly, West turned down an offer to play James Bond, saying that an American shouldn’t play Bond.) What The Rocky Horror Picture Show and Batman have in common is that both are chock full of really, really, really, really funny cultural references which I’m sure are completely lost on at least 95 per cent of the audience. (Note also that Richard O’Brien, who played Riff Raff, wrote the whole thing as well.)

    Someone lacking familiarity not only with the obscure allusions, but also with rock and roll, horror films, and US teenage life would probably not get anything at all from The Rocky Horror Picture Show. In fact, I once saw it with a group of people, one of whom was very intelligent but brought up in such a different environment that there was no way she could appreciate it. Before we went, I described it as a cult film, and she asked “What sort of cult?” 🙂

    “but I enjoyed seeing Meat a few years before he became famous.”

    Like Sting as the Bellboy in Quadrophenia?

    Like

    • All great points, Phillip. I enjoy some camp as well, and the old Batman series is a good example, but Rocky Horror never clicked with me. I might have been affected by seeing all the loonies at the midnight show every week and couldn’t imagine getting THAT into any movie. I did enjoy watching a young Susan Sarandon, though, so the movie is not without its charms. 😀

      Sting as the bellboy is another excellent example, although by the time I saw Quadrophenia for the first time I already loved The Police.

      Like

  14. J.
    February 20, 2017

    Great write-up, Rich. Never paid any attention to Meat Loaf on account of that while I Would Do Anything… song of his. Didn’t hate it, but at the time I heard it I was into my alternative rock and found the whole thing a tad bloated and ridiculous. Never really viewed it any differently since then. Still, I totally love the guy (the result of seeing him on TV and the likes) and was sad to learn of his bad health not so long ago.

    Anyhoo, I can’t pay this one a bigger compliment than saying you really have convinced me I should at least give this one a bash!

    Like

    • Thanks, J. For what it’s worth, “I Would Do Anything For Love…” was from Bat Out Of Hell II, the 16-years-later sequel that I never owned. I’ve only heard a few songs (whatever singles were released) and none of them did much for me. I will check it out on Spotify soon to see if I missed anything. If none of the clips I embedded in this post made an impact on you then I’m guessing Meat Loaf is not an artist for you, but I’m glad you’ll give it a shot.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Murphy's Law
    February 21, 2017

    Gotta love that album cover…

    Like

    • Agreed. Even if the album wasn’t that good the cover would be worth owning. Of course it’s a classic so the artwork is that much more memorable.

      Like

  16. DanicaPiche
    February 23, 2017

    I like this album and didn’t know who the musicians were. I also didn’t know about the Born to Run connection. And, I realize that I have three favorite drummers.
    Whay an educational post!

    Like

    • Ooh, I’ve reminded you of another favorite drummer here, eh? I think the person you’re referring to will show up in my drummer series at some point. I’m still curious who your other one is.

      As for “Bat Out Of Hell,” I’m happy to know you like it. Perhaps you’ll appreciate it even more next time you hear it with all the factoids I unleashed on you.

      Liked by 1 person

      • DanicaPiche
        February 23, 2017

        Awesome! I’ll look forward to my other-other favorite drummer post. My other favorite drummer is Levon Helm. It’s difficult to put them in any kind of order, but if pressed it would be: John Bonham; Levon Helm; and, Max Weinberg.
        I should pick up this album and listen to it again. I’m sure I’d hear it on a whole new level now.

        Like

      • I think Levon is on my master list but he’ll likely show up later in the series because he didn’t have a direct influence on me. I really came to appreciate his drumming & vocals when I did a complete albums series on The Band several years ago, so he’s gotten some love here at KamerTunesBlog.

        Liked by 1 person

      • DanicaPiche
        February 23, 2017

        It’s really the combination of his drumming and vocals that makes him one of my favorites. I wouldn’t be able to listen to him and hear drumming only. Then again, I’m not a drummer. I think Max Weinberg is stellar and even I can see his focus and dedication.

        Like

      • Good point about Levon’s drumming/vocal combo. The same could be said about Don Henley. My next post will have a singing drummer (or drumming singer, depending on your perspective). Max is so impressive. I often feel bad for his E Street Band predecessor, Vini “Mad Dog” Lopez, who did some phenomenal work on Bruce’s first two albums. He probably couldn’t have brought the same discipline to later songs that Max did but he deserves a higher profile.

        Liked by 1 person

      • DanicaPiche
        February 23, 2017

        Don Henley! He’d be on the cusp between my other and other-other favorites. I often think of Eagles members as one entity and don’t really separate out the instruments and vocals. Despite their solo work, they’re the Eagles.
        Max is truly amazing. I didn’t even know he had an E Street Band predecessor! Vini definitely deserves a higher profile.

        Like

      • Good points about The Eagles. Because none of them were virtuosos I think a lot of people only pay attention to the vocals & songwriting, but Henley has a very distinct style that’s perfect for The Eagles, so I think he’s a bit undervalued.

        Liked by 1 person

      • DanicaPiche
        February 23, 2017

        Yes, that distinct style contributed to their signature sound. They really were phenomenal together. When a group sounds that good it must be easier to overlook individual components and contributions.

        Liked by 1 person

      • DanicaPiche
        February 23, 2017

        Come to think of it, John Bonham is first quite easily. After that, it gets harder….

        Like

      • Bonham has always been my favorite, followed by a group of 10-12 others who made big impacts on me, but I can’t put them in any particular order. The next four I’ll be featuring in that series (next week) are not obvious choices so I’ll be curious to see how others (especially non-drummers) feel about them.

        Liked by 1 person

      • DanicaPiche
        February 23, 2017

        I’m looking forward to those posts. My other-other-other favorites include Ginger Baker, Stan Lynch and Travis Barker.

        Like

      • One of those gentleman will be in an upcoming post, another one I had forgotten about and will add to my master list (so thanks for that reminder) and the other one made no impact on me whatsoever. You can probably guess all three.

        Liked by 1 person

      • DanicaPiche
        February 23, 2017

        Intriguing! I’d bet Travis Barker had no impact on you whatsoever…and fingers crossed that Ginger will be in an upcoming post…so that leaves Stan… 🙂

        Like

      • You nailed it, Danica. I know a lot of drummers from a younger generation look up to Barker but Blink 182 means nothing to me so I have no idea if he’s really a great player. Maybe when I’m done with this series I’ll check out some of the newer, highly regarded drummers to see if I missed anything. I wasn’t a Smashing Pumpkins fan when they were really popular in the early-to-mid-’90s but I got into them later on and realized what an amazing drummer they had in Jimmy Chamberlin. So I always keep an open mind (and open ears).

        Liked by 1 person

      • DanicaPiche
        February 23, 2017

        Excellent! Lots to look forward to! He sounds great to me but I wouldn’t be able to tell you if he has an original style and technique or if he merely mimics those before him. I’m not too taken by Blink 182 in general, but Barker’s drumming stands out for me.

        Like

      • I only heard a handful of Blink 182 songs when they were at the peak of their popularity and my nephew & niece were at the age where that music appealed to them. Barker sounded like he played fast but nothing else jumped out at me. Chances are he’s better than I think but if a drummer plays music I’m not interested in it’s unlikely I’ll ever give it enough time to find out what I missed. I’m sure I’ll be highlighting some drummers who influenced me that will leave people scratching their heads.

        Liked by 1 person

      • DanicaPiche
        February 23, 2017

        That makes sense. I didn’t care too much for the Smashing Pumpkins and didn’t notice their drummer at all. Hmm…maybe Barker is just loud and fast? That’s entirely possible….

        Like

      • Of course, if the music called for “loud & fast” then he was the right man for the job. If you ever come back around to Smashing Pumpkins, focus on the drumming. I remember seeing an interview with Billy Corgan before I liked their music and he raved about how they had one of the best drummers in the world. I probably rolled my eyes at the time but a few years later I nodded in agreement.

        Liked by 1 person

      • DanicaPiche
        February 23, 2017

        Loud and fast is good, but that doesn’t make a great drummer. Ot would explain why I’m unable to comment on his originality. I should give them a spin and a closer listen. Now I’m interested in the Smashing Pumpkins….

        Like

      • For me a “good” drummer can just be someone who plays what’s right for the song and not necessarily a master technician, but if I don’t care about the songs I’ll likely never listen to the drumming. I’m currently listening to AC/DC and marveling at the hard-hitting simplicity of Phil Rudd, who is great while not be technically “great.” Does that make sense?

        Liked by 1 person

      • DanicaPiche
        February 23, 2017

        Absolutely! AC/DC is a perfect example and Paul Rudd is excellent at what he does — as are the rest of the band. In this context, Travis Barker is great.

        Like

      • For a second I wondered if actor Paul Rudd had joined AC/DC. Haha. Having just watched the Rush documentary “Time Stand Still,” which was narrated by Mr. Rudd, I’m enjoying the serendipity. Maybe Phil & Paul Rudd should switch places for a day.

        Liked by 1 person

      • DanicaPiche
        February 23, 2017

        Haha, did I say Paul? It must be time for my matcha tea! Paul as guest drummer with AC/DC would be entertaining! I have a feeling he’d hold his own….
        Rush is another excellent example of this distinction…I’m not crazy about Rush’s music — I’ve probably offended many readers now — but I recognize their collective and individual technical greatness.

        Liked by 1 person

  17. DanicaPiche
    February 23, 2017

    *What not whay. This phone app…le.sigh….

    Like

    • I knew what you meant, but I understand why you needed to clarify. I hate typos of any kind, whether they’re app-related or due to my lack of proof-reading.

      Liked by 1 person

      • DanicaPiche
        February 23, 2017

        Me too! Ack! My auto-correct is possessed. Lol 😉

        Like

      • Your “Ack!” reply has me thinking of two comic strips, Cathy and Bloom County.

        Liked by 1 person

      • DanicaPiche
        February 23, 2017

        Haha 🙂 There’s a glitch in the timing of the app — auto correct often “corrects” but doesn’t appear before the comment is posted. Endlessly frustrating….

        Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Enter your email address to subscribe to KamerTunesBlog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 325 other followers

Archives

%d bloggers like this: