KamerTunesBlog

Revisiting my extensive music collection, one artist at a time

YOU RIP, YOU SHRED – My Favorite Drummers Part 1

richie-drumming-1977I had my first drum lesson 42 years ago this month and drumming has been in my blood ever since. Although I’ve always been a part-time musician (preferring to have a full-time job and the paychecks that came with it), I still managed to play in a couple dozen bands and jammed with too many musicians to remember, in basements, rehearsal studios and on stage. Rock stardom was never my goal (except maybe when I was a teenager), which is good because I would have been very disappointed otherwise. For me it’s always been about the thrill of making music with other like-minded players, whether we worked on original or cover songs. I consider myself a very good drummer. That might sound boastful but when you’re passionate about something and you do it for more than 4 decades, you better have some proficiency and not be ashamed to admit it. I’ve always enjoyed playing with musicians who are better than me so I can step up my game and, even though I’ve become more of an in-the-pocket “groove” drummer over the years, it’s fun to show off my chops from time to time.

Sometime in the late-‘80s I had just completed a gig with my power-trio cover band. We were eating at a diner when someone who attended the show asked if I was the drummer. When I said “yes” he exclaimed, “Oh man…YOU RIP. YOU SHRED!” I had never heard those words used in this context before, so I asked him if it was a compliment. Thankfully it was, rich-drumming-with-the-particularsand I was pleased to know that someone enjoyed my playing. With that story in mind, I’ve decided to write a multi-part series on the drummers who have inspired, influenced and in some cases intimidated me over the years. This is not meant to be a “best drummers of all time” list, but a celebration of the ones who have made the greatest impact on me. I’m starting out with four guys who are likely among the favorites of nearly all drummers (and other musicians) of my generation. Each entry will include a brief paragraph and an audio &/or video sample of them in action. In subsequent posts I’ll feature some more predictable choices as well as other players with lower profiles outside the drumming community. In various ways I believe that all of these drummers rip & shred.

 

Drummer: JOHN BONHAM
Best Known For: LED ZEPPELIN
john-bonhamBy far my biggest drumming influence from my all-time favorite band. I used to emulate his sound a lot more when I was younger but I still marvel at his combination of power, groove, swing & finesse, and I try to incorporate that into my own playing. He has a reputation as a heavy-hitting hard rock drummer, but he was equally adept at subtlety. From “Good Times Bad Times” in 1969 to “I’m Gonna Crawl” in 1979, he brought something unique to every song he appears on (with “Whole Lotta Love,” “Since I’ve Been Loving You,” “When The Levee Breaks,” “Over The Hills And Far Away,” “D’yer Maker,” “Achilles Last Stand,” “Nobody’s Fault But Mine” and “Fool In The Rain” being particular favorites). His death in September 1980 at the age of 32 had a big impact on me as a 14-year-old who never had a chance to see Led Zeppelin in concert, and I often wonder how much more amazing music he (and they) would have recorded if he was still alive. It’s no surprise that they officially disbanded a few months after his death, stating that “we could not continue as we were.” Most other bands would have hired a new drummer and carried on but Bonham’s contributions were too important, and other than a few one-off performances they’ve never had a full-fledged reunion.

 

Drummer: KEITH MOON
Best Known For: THE WHO
keith-moonAs teenagers, my friends & I would argue about who was the best drummer in the world, John Bonham or Keith Moon. In hindsight that was obviously a waste of time since they were both great and didn’t need to be pitted against one another. Moon’s ferocious playing was unlike anyone before or since, flailing around the kit at breakneck speed, often sounding like he would fly off the rails but somehow landing on the right beat (any live performance of “Young Man Blues” is a perfect example of this). It helped that his rhythm section battery-mate was the stoic & virtuosic John Entwistle, who was able to keep songs anchored while Moon did his thing. I’ve always had fun playing along with Who songs even though I can never quite capture his manic energy. There are highlights aplenty throughout The Who’s catalog: “A Quick One, While He’s Away,” “I Can See For Miles,” “Sparks,” “Won’t Get Fooled Again,” “Love, Reign O’er Me” and “Who Are You” immediately come to mind. His 1978 death (like John Bonham, at only 32 years old) solidified his legend. Unfortunately the man often referred to as “Moon The Loon” took the lyrics of “My Generation” too literally: “I hope I die before I get old.”

 

Drummer: STEWART COPELAND
Best Known For: THE POLICE
stewart-copelandWhen I first became aware of The Police around 1979 they were like nothing else I had heard before. The songs were great and Sting’s voice was something to behold, but the reason they made such an immediate impact on me was the one-of-a-kind drumming of Stewart Copeland. Growing up in the Middle East exposed him to a lot of music that other rock drummers were probably unaware of, incorporating multiple “world music” influences into his reggae-on-steroids attack, topped off by the intricate hi-hat work that became his signature. He made his first splash playing with progressive rock band Curved Air for a couple of years prior to forming The Police, and he’s done a lot of great soundtrack work during & after the group’s split in the mid-‘80s, but his reputation rests firmly on those five Police studio albums and their energetic live performances (two of which I was fortunate to see, in 1982 & 1983).  Songs like “Roxanne,” “Next To You,” “Message In A Bottle,” “Walking On The Moon” and “The Bed’s Too Big Without You” wouldn’t have been as impressive without his distinctive drumming…and those are just from their first two albums. “Driven To Tears,” “Spirits In The Material World” and even the simplicity of “Every Breath You Take” are just a few of many Copeland highlights from their last three albums, and I’ve always been impressed by the snare drum crack during the final verse of “Wrapped Around Your Finger,” which subtly but definitively propels the song towards its conclusion. He also did incredible work as a solo artist (using the name Klark Kent, which I previously discussed here), as well as later bands like Animal Logic and Oysterhead.

 

Drummer: NEIL PEART
Best Known For: RUSH
neil-peartOne of the great musical pleasures of recent years has been the mainstream acceptance of Canadian progressive rock legends Rush, who have been in the upper echelon of my favorite artists since I first heard “Entre Nous” on the radio in 1980 and subsequently bought its parent album, Permanent Waves. I was already in awe of Neil Peart’s drumming by the time I saw them on the 1981 Moving Pictures tour, but experiencing that musicianship in person sent my appreciation to a whole new level. Here was someone who didn’t just bash away at his drums; he carefully composed every part, every rhythm, every fill (in addition to writing all the band’s lyrics). He’s long been considered the gold standard for rock drummers and you can point to just about any song in their discography as evidence. When he joined the band for their second album, 1975’s Fly By Night, he transformed them from an ambitious but somewhat derivative hard rock band to something entirely different, essentially inventing the concept of progressive-metal over the course of the following decade. He wasn’t the first drummer to use a massive drum kit but he turned it into an art form, with perfectly tuned drums and an array of percussion instruments that were individually credited in their album packaging (orchestra bells, bell tree, timpani, gong, cowbells, temple blocks, wind chimes, crotales, etc). He also paid tribute to the great Buddy Rich with the Burnin’ For Buddy concerts & albums that brought attention to the multiple drumming legends that took part in those sessions. Although, as I stated above, you can listen to just about any Rush song to hear his drumming mastery, “2112 Overture/The Temples Of Syrinx,” “Xanadu,” “La Villa Strangiato,” “Freewill” and “YYZ” are the perfect primers for those unfamiliar with Mr. Peart.

 

I’m looking forward to sharing stories about more of my favorite drummers soon. Stay tuned.

 

 

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62 comments on “YOU RIP, YOU SHRED – My Favorite Drummers Part 1

  1. keepsmealive
    February 13, 2017

    As a (most often frustrated kit-less) drummer myself, I say 42 years! That’s FANTASTIC!

    Good on ya for knowing where you stood with it – too many aim for stardom and don’t give 100%…

    Haha I love that you had to ask if that was a compliment. Brilliant!

    Can’t disagree with any of those drummers you chose. Big thanks for including Stewart Copeland. He gets forgotten sometimes, but what a brilliant drummer!

    Very much looking forward to more of these posts! Thanks Rich!

    Like

    • Thanks, Aaron. Glad you also love these drummers. Copeland is brilliant. I think his lower profile is probably because The Police split up so long ago and he hasn’t done anything mainstream since then (other than the Police reunion, of course). The next post is probably a couple of weeks away. I already know who I’ll be highlighting. Now I just need the time to write about them.

      Like

  2. le0pard13
    February 13, 2017

    Great list. Now tell me, what were your thoughts on the drumming in the movie WHIPLASH and its jazz-bent? Thanks.

    Like

    • Thanks for the feedback. Glad you liked the drummers I highlighted here. I thought Whiplash was great. I’ve dabbled in jazz drumming but was never committed enough to get that good, but there are plenty of jazz players who have inspired me. They’ll likely get their own post (or two) in thise series.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Kevin
    February 13, 2017

    Drums!

    I always admired Bonham’s power, but as I got older and understood drumming more (I am a great air drummer) it was “Fool in the Rain” that impressed me most. What a groove! The Purdie Shuffle on steroids. Bonham had power and nuance. Most drummers are lucky to have one of those qualities.

    To really appreciate Moon, you just have to listen to the two albums they made after he died. Plenty of good songs, but lacking that energy of reckless abandon. Keith Moon – Lead Drums.

    Stewart Copeland. Hi-hat and splash cymbals. Always fun to listen to. “Murder By Numbers.”

    Neil Peart. This is where I learned my phenomenal air drumming technique. This is where I learned how great rock drumming could be. I must have listened to “Tom Sawyer” a gazillion times as a kid, drum sticks in hands (sans drum kit). I remember getting so excited when a Rush video would be on MTV just to watch Neil. I ended up playing guitar and bass and a little keyboards, but, man, I wanted to be Neil Peart.

    Like

    • Hi Kevin. Unsurprisingly, we’re pretty much in agreement with everything here. I’m always happy when non-drummers realize how much Bonham offered beyond the sheer power he was most known for. “Fool In The Rain” might be my favorite thing he ever played on, and I love your “Purdie Shuffle On Steroids” assessment. As for air-drumming to Peart, I did that as a 15-year-old when I saw them on the Moving Pictures tour. At some point I realized that 3/4 of the crowd was doing the same thing. On a related note, did you see the movie I Love You Man? If not, I highly HIGHLY recommend it if for no other reason than the Rush references (and a brief appearance by the “holy triumvirat”).

      Like

      • Kevin
        February 14, 2017

        I’ve seen I Love You Man in bits and pieces. I did catch the cameo by our beloved heroes. Have you seen Time Stand Still yet?

        Like

      • I haven’t had the time to watch Time Stand Still yet but the Bluray is ready for me whenever I do. I did manage to watch about half of the bonus concert from the Presto tour. That was great.

        If you have the time, you should check out I Love You Man in its entirety. There are multiple Rush-related scenes throughout the movie, like this one:

        Like

      • Kevin
        February 14, 2017

        Tom Soy-eee! Paul Rudd is a real fan. He narrates Time Stand Still. I haven’t watched the Presto tour footage yet (I did see them on that tour, twice).

        Like

      • Lucky you seeing the Presto tour. That was the album that reignited my passion for Rush (after a few of the ’80s albums which I liked but didn’t love…although I eventually came to appreciate them a whole lot more). I was working at Atlantic Records at the time and was fortunate to get an advance cassette about 2 months prior to the release date. I listened to it nearly every day. It’s still my favorite of their Atlantic albums. I only saw them on the Moving Pictures and Counterparts tours, although with so many live DVDs & Blu-rays I feel like I’ve seen them many more times.

        I’m hoping to watch Time Stand Still on Monday, when I’m taking a much-needed day off (under the guise of Presidents Day).

        Like

      • I finally watched Time Stand Still today and, unsurprisingly, I loved it…although I didn’t get emotional. Although I know their story well I still came away with some fresh perspective. In many ways it was inspiring how they’ve stuck together through so much, and how they take their fans & their performances (individually & collectively) so seriously. Considering how many bands have had to deal with the death of one or more members, or lineup changes that alter the band dynamic, it’s refreshing to see three guys get along so well for so long. If this is in fact the end of the road (and I don’t think it is, other than the end of long tours), they went out pretty close to being on top. Also, seeing all the fans who are way more obsessed than I am (about Rush or any artist) made me more comfortable about my own musical craziness, which my wife sort of mocked this evening as we discussed shelving for my pending media room which requires space for 8,000+ CDs & LPs. I guess we all have our quirks, and being without my physical music collection for a year-and-a-half, with another 6-7 months to go, has made me appreciate my quirks even more.

        Like

      • Kevin
        February 20, 2017

        Yours are commendable quirks, my friend. Do you have a room to practice your drums in? I am looking for a drummer…

        From reading Neil’s books, I knew he really wasn’t a fan of touring, so I wasn’t surprised it was he who wanted to end it. I didn’t realize, however, how much physical pain he was playing through. I’m sure there will be more music from Rush, and maybe a few smaller tours or just some select shows. Geddy clearly wants to keep going. Maybe he should give Gavin Harrison a call.

        Like

      • My current set up has my drums in the living room but I almost never get to play them because our cat is always around and I don’t want to freak him out with loud noises. Fortunately, I have my electronic kit in one of the guest rooms so I’m able to keep my chops up. Once our renovations are complete (by late 2017) I will have a dedicated music space which will include my music collection, a large TV, surround sound set up and a dedicated area for my drums (possibly the acoustic AND electric kits). I want to take a month off once it’s done to enjoy the space but I might just have to take a few personal days here & there.

        I can’t see Geddy & Alex forming a new trio with another drummer. Guys like Gavin Harrison, Marco Minnemann and Nick D’Virgilio would acquit themselves nicely if they did, but I imagine they would put together a larger collective to distinguish the new group from Rush. I agree that there will be more music from them and possibly some smaller tours or even a residency somewhere where fans can travel to them (even though that would eliminate Neil’s motorcycle adventures between gigs). The difficult part about smaller tours is that the shows still require a massive crew, and it may not be cost-effective for them to do only a handful of shows. They’ve set a standard for themselves & their fans which is hard to maintain.

        Like

  4. Heavy Metal Overload
    February 13, 2017

    Great post Rich and kudos on your drum dedication. And a very sound list of drum talent too. Keith Moon is a big drum hero of mine especially!

    Like

    • Thanks, Scott. I’m pleased that you like my choices here. Hopefully we’ll find more common ground as this series progresses. Moon was such a monster behind that massive kit, and he always looked like he was having a blast.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. 1537
    February 13, 2017

    I had no idea you could shred on drums! Really enjoyed this one Rich< I couldn't argue you with any of these but my all-time fave is missing, at least this time around.

    Like

    • keepsmealive
      February 13, 2017

      Your all-timer is Animal, isn’t it? Mine too! 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, Joe. I had no idea about my “ripping & shredding” abilities until that gentleman enlightened me. I’m curious to find out who your all-time fave is. Hopefully he’ll show up here in an upcoming post.

      Liked by 1 person

      • 1537
        February 14, 2017

        Bill Ward. But I love Stephen Perkins too.

        I echo Aaron too, great to see you pick Copeland he doesn’t seem to get the credit he deserves.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Bill Ward is great, and underappreciated, but he probably won’t make the cut for this series since I was never really influenced by him. I did commend his drumming many times during my Sabbath series a few years ago, so he hasn’t been overlooked at KamerTunesBlog.

        Liked by 1 person

      • 1537
        February 14, 2017

        Boo!

        Like

      • Are you trying to scare me, or am I being booed for the first time?

        Liked by 1 person

      • 1537
        February 14, 2017

        Scare you into including Bill. Poor Bill.

        Like

      • He’s already gotten his fair share of coverage here. If you want Bill to get some more love, start your own damn drummer series. 😀

        Liked by 2 people

  6. mikeladano
    February 14, 2017

    A fine, diverse list of drummers.

    Like

  7. stephen1001
    February 14, 2017

    Nice series idea Rich!
    No complaints about these lads – in the ‘pick your living supergroup’ exercise, Copeland’s inevitably my drummer, love the cymbal work!

    Like

    • Thanks, Geoff. Yep, Copeland is still one of the best, as he proved during the Police reunion. I like how he still refers to them as “my band.” In some ways I feel bad for him, because he had such a great outlet for his abilities when they were together, but that only lasted for about 6 years. Sting has done some great work but, in my opinion, none of his solo albums approached what he did with The Police.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Phillip Helbig
    February 14, 2017

    I am in the R30 video, which was filmed in Frankfurt am Main in Germany. I am standing in front of Alex Lifeson. Maybe not visible here, but I am during “Red Barchetta”, still sporting my long hair which would fall victim to chemotherapy (for a while, I looked like Rich) soon after. I went into hospital on the following day and did thing briefly about missing the concert, but managed to be there with lots of painkillers and the barrier at the front to hold on to.

    Peart is definitely number one, hands down. Not only that, he is a serious contender for best rock lyricist as well (up there with, say, Ian Anderson and Roger Waters, though none of these are comparable really). He is also in a band with serious contenders for best rock bassist and best rock guitarist. Moon is almost as good. I was impressed with Zak Starkey recently, playing with The Who. Obviously channelling Moon. Pino Palladino on bass was great as well, effortlessly playing Entwistle’s complicated parts. Zak’s father Richard manages to be both the most famous drummer ever and also one of the most underrated.

    I saw Pierre Moerlen with mostly instrumental Swedish progressive-rock outfit Tribute (originally a prog-rock tribute band, hence the name) at the Markthalle in Hamburg back in the mid-1980s. This is also on YouTube; maybe I can be glimpsed there as well. They really deserve to be more widely known. Moerlen was a really, really, really good drummer, and also a very competent 4-mallet marimba player. (Tribute were probably the only prog band to feature a full-time percussionist, including Marimba (usually played by someone else, but occasionally played by Moerlen).)

    Like

    • Phillip Helbig
      February 14, 2017

      Here are some videos from that Tribute concert. Four videos, one song. Hey, it’s prog! The rest of the concert was great, too!

      The band featured two guitarists. This song is about 20 minutes, with the first 10 just two classical guitars and, later, some female vocals (hey, it’s prog!). Get this, though: it is not the two guitarists playing here, however, but rather the bassist and the keyboarder. They wrote the song after a long day of hitchhiking in Germany, when they had found a monastery where they could stay the night.

      Then the full band kicks in:

      Then Moerlen’s solo, which is not on the studio version. “Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!”

      And then the last quarter of the song:

      I WAS THERE!

      Like

      • Phillip Helbig
        February 14, 2017

        By the way, the guy with the Afro and the two women are siblings. After this concert, I dressed in white for a few days. 🙂

        Like

      • Haha, I love how you were not only inspired by the music but also by their wardrobe.

        Like

      • Thanks for sharing those clips, Phillip. I had to watch them in spurts throughout the day but it was worth the effort. Great stuff. You must be thrilled that you saw that show in person.

        Like

    • I think it’s cool that you’re somewhere on the R30 video. Obviously I wouldn’t be able to pick you out but the next time I play the DVD I’ll assume that any long-haired dude could be you.

      When it comes to music I rarely talk in absolutes, so I can’t say that Peart is definitely number one…although clearly he’s one of my favorites. There are so many factors that make for a great drummer (as you say, Ringo is one of them, yet he has a reputation as a simple, basic drummer), and someone like Phil Rudd is just as inspiring to me as drummers with much more technical prowess.

      I never heard of Tribute before you mentioned them but I’m familiar with Pierre Moerlen from Gong. It’s cool that you got to see that band.

      Like

  9. Kevin
    February 14, 2017

    You’ve got me thinking about drums. You have to see this (if you haven’t already). I watched this about 100 times.

    Like

    • Thanks for highlighting that Gavin Harrison performance, Kevin. He is a monster and will likely appear at some point in this series alongside a few other latter-day prog drummers. His work with Porcupine Tree, King Crimson and his collaborations with O5ric are often awe-inspiring.

      Like

      • Phillip Helbig
        February 16, 2017

        Speaking of King Crimson, I’m surprised that Michael Giles just sort of vanished after his stint with Crimson. I know he didn’t die young or whatever, but why didn’t he become a Drum God?

        Like

      • Great point. Maybe he couldn’t find the right project, had a family, needed to get a real job, etc? He was a monster during his time with KC.

        Like

      • Phillip Helbig
        February 16, 2017

        Yes, times were different back then. Around the same time, Clive Bunker was the drummer with Jethro Tull. He then left the band to get married!

        His successor, Barriemore Barlow, was also a great drummer, but essentially disappeared without a trace after his time with Tull.

        Like

      • Didn’t realize that was the reason Clive left Tull. Barlow played on a couple of songs from Robert Plant’s second solo album. Phil Collins played on the others. Similar to Plant’s first album, except Cozy Powell played on two songs. Both “alternate” drummers played on tracks 4 & 7 on their respective albums. Coincidence…or by design?

        Like

  10. Dom Most
    February 15, 2017

    Loved your article, I see myself in your words, playin since I was 14 (I’m 59) and I just came back from band practice! I also was heavily influenced by Bonzo and may I say while Bonham and Moon would be on my list too, I would have Carl Palmer from ELP and Bill Bruford from Yes on mine.
    Keep playing drums, it keeps you young!

    Like

    • Hi Dom. Thanks so much for stopping by. It’s always fun to meet another drummer, especially someone with similar influences. I”m happy to hear you’re still playing regularly at 59. I’m currently in between bands due to various circumstances, but I practice all the time and hope to find other like-minded musicians to play with when my whole-house renovation project ends later this year. As for Carl Palmer & Bill Bruford, both of them will show up in future installments in this series. Stay tuned…

      Cheers.
      Rich

      Like

  11. juliancreators
    February 15, 2017

    Really enjoyed reading this man! Would love for you to join our Facebook community for music fans and bloggers 🙂 https://www.facebook.com/groups/musicmoguls/

    Like

    • Hi Julian. Thanks for stopping by. I will definitely check out your FB group. I especially like the “positivity” aspect, which seems to be lacking in most places on the internet.

      Cheers.
      Rich

      Liked by 1 person

      • juliancreators
        February 16, 2017

        Awesome! Yea it’s a super positive and supportive group for writers and music fans to share their thoughts with each other 🙂 Were you able to join alright?

        Like

      • Looking forward to seeing what everyone in the FB group has to offer. Thanks again for the invitation.

        Liked by 1 person

      • julianarde
        February 17, 2017

        Glad to have you in the group!

        Liked by 1 person

  12. J.
    February 16, 2017

    Excellent, Rich. Looking forward to seeing who makes an appearance during this series. A few of these guys I didn’t (or don’t) listen to enough until the last few years. Bonham particularly… probably the standout from this batch for me.

    Like

  13. DanicaPiche
    February 16, 2017

    Great idea for a series, Rich! I’m already looking forward to more. My personal favorite from this list is Bonham. Fingers crossed that you’ll cover my other favorite drummer at some point in this series.
    Also hoping that we’ll be seeing clips of you ripping and shredding. 🙂

    Like

    • Thanks, Danica. I’m pleased to know that you also rank Bonham so highly. Hopefully your other favorite drummer will show up here at some point. Stay tuned.

      Hmm, I hadn’t thought about including my own “ripping” & “shredding.” I don’t have any easily-accessible video footage but I can probably link to audio clips of various bands I’ve played with via YouTube and SoundCloud at the end of the series. Thanks for the suggestion.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Jeff Kempin
    February 17, 2017

    I agree with Danica, this is a great idea for a new series! The 4 you picked in this first entry are all slam dunks and all have really defined the sound of their respective bands like few other drummers have. These guys weren’t just timekeepers, they propelled the sound. The Who weren’t THE WHO after Moon’s death and Led Zeppelin didn’t even try after Bonham’s death, which is admirable.
    Copeland has power but he also has a lot of sublety too. You can hear a lot of little touches and flourishes in a lot of those old Police songs. And what can you say about Neal Peart…he’s a legend no doubt about it. Will be interested to see your future picks

    Like

    • Thanks, Jeff. I’m glad you like the concept of this series. Believe it or not, some people on a couple of Facebook pages where I promoted this post questioned the inclusion of Stewart Copeland. I’m not sure how anyone with even a casual interest in musicianship would think he’s somehow not one of the best rock drummers of all time. I guess it’s another example of everyone having an opinion & feeling the need to share it, no matter how ill-informed.

      I like a lot of Who music after Moon died but they were clearly not the same band, and you know I agree with your assessment of Zeppelin being “admirable” for not continuing without Bonham. They might be the only band who didn’t consider carrying on with a replacement after losing a member, another reason why they’re so special.

      Like

  15. Victim of the Fury
    February 18, 2017

    As a non-sticksman, I can’t claim any great ability to recognize nuance as I make my drumming picks but I’ve seen Peart play live three times and been amazed each time, enjoyed Jason’s version of his dad John’s playing a few times and found myself impressed but lamenting never having experienced the tree from which the acorn fell, and finally heard Mike Portnoy live multiple times playing with multiple bands and each time have been won over by the sheer joy with which he drums.

    Like

    • I can’t imagine anyone seeing Neil Peart and not being impressed. Even my father, who is not a rock fan but learned to appreciate some of the music I played in the car during high school, remarked how great Peart was when Rush played at the amphitheater where he worked for several years. That was without prompting him that he should take notice of the drummer.

      I saw Jason Bonham’s LZ Experience a few years ago and I wasn’t that impressed. Jason is a talented drummer but, even though the comparison is unfair, he’s not in the same league as his dad. I’m glad he’s keeping the music alive, and at least there’s a bloodline to the original Zeppelin whenever he plays.

      Portnoy is a character and his joy definitely shows through no matter who he’s playing with. He will definitely show up at some point in this series.

      Like

  16. Tangled Up In Music
    February 19, 2017

    The Who’s performance at the Rock and Roll Circus is such a joy to watch, especially because of Keith’s enthusiasm and unpredictability. It seemed like he truly lived every performance he was on.

    Like

    • I love that Who performance. I always assumed the Stones kept that show under wraps for so long because they didn’t want to be upstaged by The Who, even though both bands sounded great. I completely agree with your comment about Moon. There’s so much joy in every performance I’ve ever seen. Even those times they had to pretend they were playing and Moon held his sticks funny without actually striking the drums. He clearly didn’t take himself seriously even though he was seriously great.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Pingback: YOU RIP, YOU SHRED – My Favorite Drummers Part 2 | KamerTunesBlog

  18. Pingback: YOU RIP, YOU SHRED – My Favorite Drummers Part 3 | KamerTunesBlog

  19. Pingback: Forty Year Friday – RUSH “A FAREWELL TO KINGS” | KamerTunesBlog

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