KamerTunesBlog

Revisiting my extensive music collection, one artist at a time

YOU RIP, YOU SHRED – My Favorite Drummers Part 2

Welcome to “You Rip, You Shred,” the ongoing series on my favorite drummers. For an explanation of the phrase “you rip, you shred,” please read the introduction in Part 1. As I mentioned in that post, this is not meant to be a “best drummers of all time” list, but a celebration of the ones who have made the greatest impact on me. Here are four more drummers who have influenced & inspired me in various ways.

 

Drummer: MARK BRZEZICKI
Best Known For: BIG COUNTRY, PETE TOWNSHEND
mark-brzezicki
Although I’ve never been able to master his technique, no drummer over the last 35 years has had a bigger influence on me than Mark Brzezicki. I first became aware of him via his contributions to Pete Townshend’s early-‘80s solo albums, Empty Glass and All The Best Cowboys Have Chinese Eyes, but it was his monumental work as a member of Big Country that’s made the biggest impact on me. I’ve previously discussed them in my Great Out Of The Gate and Thirty Year Thursday series so it should come as no surprise how much I love this band. Singer/guitarist/songwriter Stuart Adamson was the focal point but it was the rhythm section of Brzezicki and bassist Tony Butler (who once billed themselves as “Rhythm For Hire”) that elevated them above all of their contemporaries. Thanks to percussion-centric producer Steve Lillywhite, Brzezicki’s drumming is front & center throughout their first two albums (The Crossing and Steeltown). His style, which pairs precise military snare drum work with intricate cymbal & hi-hat accents and tom-tom-heavy patterns, is deceptively complex. I’ve met many casual fans who never paid attention to the drumming on Big Country songs until I pointed it out to them, but once they focused on it they knew exactly why I was so passionate. Songs like “In A Big Country” (especially the album version with the extended intro), Fields Of Fire,” “Porrohman,” “Wonderland,” “Where The Rose Is Sown,” “Tall Ships Go,” “Look Away,” “The Seer,” “God’s Great Mistake,” “The President Slipped And Fell” and so many others showcase a drummer in the same league as the greats of progressive rock & jazz-fusion. Without resorting to showboating, he can embellish a 4/4 rhythm with impressive fills & syncopation while respecting the integrity of the song. He’s also worked in the studio & on stage with The Cult, Ultravox, Procol Harum, Fish, Simon Townshend (with whom he played in On The Air, whose only album was included in my One And Done series) and numerous other artists. His most recent project, ESP, is a wonderful modern prog-rock collective that just released its debut album, Invisible Din. I was fortunate to meet Mr. Brzezicki (whose name I have no trouble spelling) twice in the early ‘90s and he was gracious & friendly both times. Prevailing wisdom dictates that you should never meet your heroes, but this disproves that theory.

 

Drummer: PHIL COLLINS
Best Known For: GENESIS, BRAND X, SOLO
phil-collins
Another hero I had the privilege of meeting twice (albeit briefly) is Phil Collins, who made his name as the drummer & backing vocalist with Genesis before taking over lead vocals from Peter Gabriel in the mid-‘70s without ever relinquishing his drum throne. Before I could really wrap my head around their early sophisticated & challenging material, I was drawn in by the streamlined version of the band that released Duke, Abacab and Genesis (aka The ‘Mama’ Album). During this era he also embarked on a massively successful solo career, at times blurring the line between the band’s work & his own, although for us passionate fans the delineation was clear. Everyone knows the massive 10-note drum fill from “In The Air Tonight,” and his playing on Genesis hits like “Turn It On Again,” “No Reply At All,” “Illegal Alien” and “Land Of Confusion,” as well as his duet with Phillip Bailey, “Easy Lover,” was instantly identifiable. I played along with many of these songs throughout high school since I could mimic his drum parts, but he’s a legend in the drumming world because of early Genesis tracks like “Watcher Of The Skies,” “Firth Of Fifth,” “In The Cage,” “Robbery, Assault & Battery” and “Los Endos” (on tour the latter usually featured one of his jaw-dropping drum duets with Chester Thompson). He also did some incredible work with jazz-fusion outfit Brand X, played on Robert Plant’s first two solo albums and brought his individual sound to records by Peter Gabriel, Eric Clapton, John Martyn and countless others, not to mention his transatlantic dual appearances at Live Aid, including a performance with the briefly reunited Led Zeppelin. He’s simply one of the best and I learned so much about groove, syncopation & dynamics from him.

 

Drummer: LIBERTY DEVITTO
Best Known For: BILLY JOEL
liberty-devitto
I’ve made no secret of how much Billy Joel’s music has meant to me, most recently in posts about The Stranger and The Bridge. As I previously stated, I feel that Joel’s music is so revered in large part because of his core band, which appeared on the classic albums he released between 1976 & 1986. The longest-serving member of that group is drummer Liberty DeVitto, whose diverse influences & impressive musicality brought life to so many of Joel’s recordings, while his infectious energy on stage made him as much a focal point of Billy Joel concerts as Joel himself. Anyone with seats behind the stage would certainly agree. He could add just the right textures to low-key tracks like “Summer, Highland Falls,” “Just The Way You Are” & “Don’t Ask Me Why,” provide tension-and-release to ballads like “Honesty,” “An Innocent Man” & “This Night,” blast through rockers like “Prelude/Angry Young Man,” “Miami 2017 (Seen The Lights Go Out On Broadway),” “It’s Still Rock And Roll To Me,” “Pressure” & “Allentown” and show off his jazz chops for “Zanzibar” & “Big Man On Mulberry Street.” For one of Joel’s most beloved compositions, the epic “Scenes From An Italian Restaurant,” DeVitto effortlessly propels the song by blending all of these elements. Throughout high school, when I would spend hours playing along to my favorite songs, I learned so much from emulating DeVitto’s drumming. His approach was as integral as any other drummer to finding my own style. Instead of yearning for rock stardom, my ultimate goal was always to be “the Liberty DeVitto” in a great songwriter’s band. I never quite achieved that but I have played with some excellent writers, and each time I did my best to add a DeVitto-esque touch to every song. Joel severed ties with his longtime drummer more than a decade ago, and in spite of the good reviews his concerts receive, his music will never sound the same to me without DeVitto & his bandmates from the ‘70s & ‘80ss. He’s also been a successful studio musician for artists like Phoebe Snow, Karen Carpenter & Meat Loaf, and he’s currently playing with two other members of the classic Billy Joel Band lineup as The Lords Of 52nd Street. I’m glad I got to see him perform several times and that he’s still out there making people smile from behind the drumkit.

 

Drummer: KENNY ARONOFF
Best Known For: JOHN (COUGAR) MELLENCAMP, JOHN FOGERTY, HUNDREDS OF RECORDING SESSIONS
kenny-aronoff
The first time I saw Kenny Aronoff performing was during John Cougar’s appearance on Saturday Night Live in 1982. He was the skinny bald guy drumming to “Hurts So Good” and “Ain’t Even Done With The Night,” two slabs of catchy pop/rock. I liked both songs and quickly bought Cougar’s soon-to-be chart-topping breakthrough album, American Fool, which included two other gems: “Hand To Hold On To” and “Jack & Diane.” The latter became Cougar’s signature song thanks in large part to Aronoff’s mid-song drum fill and the distinctive groove that followed. Over the course of eight more albums, Aronoff’s powerful drumming came to define the John (Cougar) Mellencamp sound, always pushing the songs forward with tight rhythms, subtle flourishes and a punchy snare drum crack that became his trademark. Without his drumming, “Pink Houses,” “Authority Song,” “Small Town,” “Lonely Old Night,” “Check It Out,” “Cherry Bomb,” “Love And Happiness,” Mellencamp’s version of Van Morrison’s “Wild Night” and so many others wouldn’t be the classics that they became. Aronoff grew more confident as Mellencamp’s career soared, and he quickly became an in-demand session drummer alongside his full-time gig. After he & Mellencamp parted ways, John Fogerty came calling and Aronoff has spent the next 20+ years beefing up Fogerty’s songs and bringing all of his Creedence Clearwater Revival classics to life. During this time he shaved his head, started wearing wrap-around shades and bulked up, resulting in his instantly recognizable muscular physique & chrome-dome appearance. Of the hundreds of other albums he’s appeared on, his work with Marshall Crenshaw, Alice Cooper and BoDeans made the biggest impact on me. He even briefly played with Smashing Pumpkins. If I had dedicated myself to being a full-time drummer, I would have been happy with a career like Kenny Aronoff has had. He’s also the gold standard for us bald drummers.

 

I realize these may not be the most obvious choices, with only one household name, but all four of these men have made huge musical contributions and deserve to be celebrated & revered. Next time I’ll discuss four more legendary drummers, three of whom made their marks in progressive rock.

 

drummers-collage-2

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56 comments on “YOU RIP, YOU SHRED – My Favorite Drummers Part 2

  1. J.
    February 27, 2017

    Nice to see Brzezicki in there. Unexpected, too. As for Phil, I mentioned elsewhere fairly recently that I found Phil a tad annoying. Think it was the result of Buster and the likes of I Can’t Dance. Admittedly, I didn’t bother with any of his solo stuff or his drumming (aside from that intro you mentioned already). However, he made a film about Glasgow a few years ago that really got my attention and naturally I started looking at him a bit differently. Haven’t bought any albums yet, right enough.

    Looking forward to your next post.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Heavy Metal Overload
      February 27, 2017

      Sadly, the film was a different Phil Collins. So the real Phil can go back to just being annoying!

      Liked by 1 person

      • J.
        February 27, 2017

        Haha! Poor annoying Phil.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Heavy Metal Overload
        February 27, 2017

        That’s put him back in his place! Did you go and see that film in Queens Park BTW?

        Like

      • J.
        February 27, 2017

        I actually had no idea. I saw ‘Phil Collins’ and thought “oh, that’s interesting”.

        But aye, I had tickets for it, but something got in the way of going. Can’t mind what it was now. You?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Heavy Metal Overload
        February 27, 2017

        Yeah it was really cool. The film wasn’t all that great but it had a great atmosphere. It was good fun!

        Liked by 1 person

      • So no love for either Phil Collins here, eh? Although it sounds like Scott is more on board regarding the more well-known Phil’s drumming. I like how this post led to a conversation about a film by a guy with the same name as one of the drummers I wrote about. The joys of the blogosphere. Thanks for keeping things interesting.

        J., I can understand why people got tired of Phil Collins after his ’80s over-exposure (even he admits that), but that doesn’t take away from a career mostly filled with amazing music. Also, he wasn’t just a singer who happened to play drums. In his prime he was one of the best drummers in rock & fusion, and he’s still influencing generations of drummers. I know that won’t make you change your mind about him but I always enjoy defending him.

        Liked by 1 person

      • J.
        February 27, 2017

        I thought it would be. Was it pouring that night? I seem to remember it being pouring and getting soaked. Then deciding I wasn’t doing anything. Perhaps.

        But, importantly, it wasn’t really all that great a film then… I shouldn’t bother tracking it down?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Heavy Metal Overload
        February 27, 2017

        It was raining but stopped just at the start of the event I think. It got quite nice at sundown. All my memories are to do with the spectacle and atmosphere… I can’t remember much about the film other than there was something obnoxious about it!

        Liked by 1 person

      • J.
        February 27, 2017

        I figured the actual event would have been more memorable than the movie.

        It would have been better if it was the same Phil Collins. That’s actually really disappointed me.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Heavy Metal Overload
        February 27, 2017

        So the real Phil is now as disappointing as he is annoying!

        Liked by 1 person

      • J.
        February 27, 2017

        Affirmative!

        Liked by 1 person

      • deKE
        February 27, 2017

        If Phil drummed in a Black Metal Band HMO would be all over it!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Now that Phil is un-retired maybe that will happen…..but probably not.

        Liked by 1 person

      • deKE
        February 27, 2017

        Well Rich he would definitely need a neck brace drumming at that speed.
        I’m not a huge Phil/Genesis fan but those tracks that are on the Knebworth 1990 album are excellent…..

        Like

      • I have that Knebworth CD but haven’t played it in years. I’ll have to give it a spin whenever my collection is back on the shelves later this year.

        Good point about Phil needing a neck brace playing at that speed, although in his prime most speed metal bands wouldn’t have been able to keep up with him (or figure out what time signature he was playing).

        Liked by 1 person

      • deKE
        February 27, 2017

        Sorry to shift from drummers to singers but Plant’s version of Liar’s Dance is the Best on Knebworth..

        Like

      • Wasn’t that song on Manic Nirvana? Sadly that’s my least favorite Plant album so I probably didn’t pay the Knebworth version much attention. I loved his band back then but the songs didn’t do anything for me. I also have a fun story about getting an advance copy of that album when I worked at Atlantic Records. I’ll have to share it here sometime.

        Like

      • deKE
        February 27, 2017

        Yeah for sure! Next to Now & Zen Manic Nirvana is my favourite of Plants solo output…Please share that story! You should write about you antidotes at Atlantic Records ….

        Like

      • I love Plant’s first three solo albums the most (yep, even Shaken N Stirred). Was really into Now And Zen at the time but it hasn’t held up that well for me (although I still love about half that album). No time for the Manic Nirvana story now but will try to get back to it soon. As for Atlantic stories, although I was there for 6 years (’88-’94) I don’t have any anecdotes that would be worth writing. It was mostly working crazy hours & accumulating a ridiculous amount of CDs.

        Liked by 1 person

      • J.
        February 28, 2017

        Especially if the band was led by Josh Homme! Haha!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Heavy Metal Overload
    February 27, 2017

    Another cool selection. I heartily approve of Mark and Phil but I’ll have to take your word for it with the other two!

    Like

  3. DanicaPiche
    February 27, 2017

    Of this selection my favorite sound is John Mellencamp’s, including te drumming. Interesting to learn more about the man behind the kit. The League of Bald Drummers would make an intriguing series too.

    One of the things I enjoy most aboit blogging are the conversations — including the tangents. I’ve had some responses I never would have expected and it certainly does keep things interesting. 🙂

    Like

    • I like the title, The League Of Bald Drummers. So far in this series that includes Phil Collins, Kenny Aronoff, Liberty DeVitto (now, but not in his Billy Joel years) and possibly Neil Peart (who’s been wearing that skull cap so many years that he’s likely covering up hair loss).

      I agree about blogging conversations & tangents. I’ve always said that one of the main reasons for my blog is to start conversations with fellow music lovers…and just like the in-person conversations with my friends, we go off in all kinds of directions.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. DanicaPiche
    February 27, 2017

    Omg typos! I’m going to have to stop using the phone app. I like the convenience but this is ridiculous…. *le sigh*

    Like

  5. Kevin
    February 27, 2017

    Brzezicki’s work with Townshend is always excellent (as is Simon Phillips). Although I am no Big Country expert (Greatest Hits), I love what he does on “Look Away” with that difficult 6/8 rhythm.

    Anyone who doubts Collins’ work need look no further that Brand X.

    I never really rated Devitto, but what he does on the prog-like intro to “Angry Young Man” is fantastic.

    Like

    • Thanks for mentioning Simon Phillips, who will no doubt show up in this series. I loved how, in 1993, Simon joined Big Country for their Buffalo Skinners album while Mark played on Townshend’s Pyschoderelict, but for the subsequent tours they swapped roles. I saw both tours so I was thrilled to experience two of my favorite drummers in the same year.

      Needless to say I completely agree about Phil’s work with Brand X. Astonishing stuff.

      Like

      • Kevin
        February 27, 2017

        Any particular Big Country album you would suggest? Stuart Adamson, geez, how sad.

        Like

      • You can’t go wrong with the debut, The Crossing, which still holds up extremely well. The follow-up, Steeltown, is probably my favorite but it’s dark & dense and could take a while to grow on you. I think it’s the most powerful album of the ’80s, and one of the best of all-time. The Seer is easier to digest and almost as good as the previous two. Depending on how you feel about any/all of those albums, you can explore later in their catalog, but their sound changed a great deal. I love them all, but your mileage may vary.

        Like

  6. mikeladano
    February 27, 2017

    Glad to see Aranoff on this list, a personal favourite!

    First time I saw him was an old Mellencamp video…he really stood out.

    Like

    • Glad you agree about Aronoff. He’s a powerhouse behind the drumkit. He really capitalized on Mellencamp’s popularity. He was always visible in those videos.

      Like

  7. Enjoyable piece and good to see Liberty getting the nod from you, Rich. I’ve always loved his feel too, especially on Billy’s ’52nd Street’ album – ‘Stiletto’ is a killer groove and how about ‘Rosalinda’s Eyes’ where I believe he plays with a brush in the right hand and stick in the left… (Maybe he also did that on ‘Just The Way You Are’…)

    Like

    • Thanks, Matt. Always nice to hear from someone else who appreciates Liberty’s essential contributions to Billy Joel’s music. I agree that 52nd Street contains some of his best drumming. Not sure about the brush/stick combo on “Just The Way You Are.” I always thought it was just brushes. Whenever I use them I think of Liberty’s work on that song.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Major muso alert: listening again, I’m pretty sure it’s one brush and one stick. He’s playing 8s with the brush in the right hand and hitting the snare and tom with the left… Check it out. You can see him playing the groove here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I7mJElVq7LI

        Like

      • Good catch, Matt. I had forgotten about his tom-tom accents which wouldn’t have sounded that way with brushes. I’ve never been a muso or a gear-head so I usually defer those kinds of specifics to people who are.

        Like

      • Know what you mean. But when I do jazz gigs, I often find myself playing a bossa nova with one brush and one stick. Not sure why I do that, but subconsciously it must be because I’ve heard Liberty do it too…

        Like

      • I’ve never played a straight-up jazz gig but I’ve done nightclub gigs with some jazzy tunes that featured brushes. Never thought to have a brush in one hand & a stick in the other, although I’ve probably done that with a mallet occasionally so I could get that slow-building splash on the crash cymbal while still keeping the beat.

        Like

  8. stephen1001
    February 28, 2017

    I enjoyed this one Rich – nice to see the spotlight on some less familiar drummers that play with very familiar musicians.
    Well said about Liberty Devitto’s contributions especially!

    Like

    • Thanks, Geoff. A lot of people have heard these guys but probably don’t realize how good they are or how much they contributed to the songs they love (other than Phil Collins, of course, who’s a household name). I’m glad you also appreciate Liberty’s drumming. One of my all-time heroes.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. keepsmealive
    March 1, 2017

    Not obvious choices, perhaps, but all of them completely solid! Great shout for Brzezicki, you nailed that one. And Aronoff? Total killer. I was waiting for him to turn up in this series. You know, I was once blind-sided and honoured by the guitar player in a band I was in, him saying my playing felt like Aronoff’s. I was shocked – like, dude, are you sure you were listening to ME play? ‘Cos that guy’s AMAZING. I… am not. Haha

    And you got to mee Collins? Twice? Be it brief, I hope you got to thank him for all the music. That guy’s a legend.

    Like

    • Are you sure your guitar player wasn’t saying “Aaron, you’re off”? Haha, just kidding. I couldn’t resist. It’s always nice to get compliments like that. I remember a girl once commenting after a gig I just played that she heard some Stewart Copeland influence. The music was far removed from The Police but it was cool that she noticed the little flourishes I added.

      Both times I met Phil Collins I was working at Atlantic. I wasn’t in one of the “cool” departments (like A&R, Publicity, Promotion, etc), so we never saw any artists, but he was by the elevators when I was walking by and just had to say hi. Spoke with him for about 30 seconds & he was very nice. I probably could have talked with him longer but I didn’t want to overstay my welcome. Meeting Brzezicki was a major highlight for me. The second time I met him, about 2 years later, I told him that we met before and he replied, “Yeah, I think I remember.” He was just being nice but I really appreciated that.

      Like

  10. Alyson
    March 2, 2017

    Don’t know much about drumming and drummers I’m afraid but was pleased to see you had mentioned the Big Country drummer in this list – I always loved their sound but probably wouldn’t have realised that much of it was down to Mark Brzezicki so thanks for this new piece of knowledge.

    Like

    • Thanks, Alyson. It makes me smile that you appreciated Big Country’s music and now you’ll have something else to listen for the next time you hear them.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Alyson
        March 2, 2017

        Actually Scotland was awash with excellent bands in the mid ’80s and I wrote about some of them in a series last summer. Stuart Adamson sadly died at a very young age in Hawaii of all places.

        Like

      • I have a weird affinity for Scottish music (possibly because I believe I was Scottish in a previous life). Not only do I love the sound of bagpipes, but starting in the ’80s I fell in love with Big Country, The Proclaimers, Texas, etc., and later discovered Prefab Sprout, Deacon Blue, Sensational Alex Harvey Band, Teenage Fanclub and numerous others.

        Yep, the loss of Stuart Adamson was huge. The way people responded to the deaths of David Bowie, Prince, Lou Reed, etc, that’s how I felt when it happened, and the loss still stings every time I listen to his music.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Alyson
        March 2, 2017

        Good to know – The sound of a massed pipe band is a moving experience for me so glad you like the sound of the bagpipes.

        As for Stuart you really were a fan weren’t you – I hadn’t realised they were as big as they must have been in the US. My husbands art teacher at school formed a band called Runrig that played Celtic/Gaelic rock – they were also really successful in the ’80s but a bit more niche probably so you possibly won’t have heard of them. Rousing stuff though and very very Scottish!

        Like

      • Big Country were huge here for a brief period in the ’80s but they quickly became a cult band. I love Runrig. Have about 5-6 albums. All great.

        Like

      • Alyson
        March 2, 2017

        Well wouldn’t have expected that – Mr WIAA went down the art school route probably because of Donnie Munro. Fantastic singer back in the day.

        Like

      • Mr. Munro had a great voice. Not sure if he’s still singing these days. Didn’t he go into politics & leave the band for a while? Another similar Scottish band that combined traditional Celtic melodies & instrumentation with rock & roll was Wolfstone. Somehow I forgot to mention my second favorite Scottish band, right behind my beloved Big Country: Del Amitri. Can’t tell you how much I love that band.

        Like

      • Alyson
        March 3, 2017

        Well this is a surprise – Wolfstone are from a place very nearby and I used to work with Stuart Eaglesham’s brother. Used to work with Donnie Munro’s wife also – we’re all connected here! Donnie still doing a bit of singing but didn’t ever get his seat in Parliament as he didn’t go down the “safe seat route” and his preferred constituency was Skye where there was a long-standing star politician. I did a post about him on my blog last year if you want to look – I know how much you like our very sweet Scottish tablet and that is what Donnie makes now for his son’s restaurant in Skye. We went last year and yes, he can even be spotted loading the dishwasher – How things change. Del Amitri excellent also and again I’m surprised they were quite big in the US. Your name will have to change to MacKamerman if this continues!!

        Like

      • I keep surprising you with my crazy Scottish music obsession. Like Big Country, Del Amitri had a brief window of being popular here, but it was only one song. Beyond that, they were a cult band. I also forgot to mention the great but short-lived Danny Wilson (Gary Clark is an amazing songwriter & singer), Orange Juice/Edwyn Collins, The Waterboys, Simple Minds (whose great early albums I only discovered in recent years), Trashcan Sinatras, Travis and Fish (from Marillion). As for MacKamerman, consider these facts: I was born in Caledonian Hospital (Brooklyn, NY), I’m a redhead (when I had hair, at least), my middle name in Scott and the first time I stepped foot in Scotland I felt like I was in my homeland. Weird, right? A few years ago my wife bought me a Lairdship at Dunans Castle in Glendaruel. I “own” a 1-square-foot plot of land on the grounds of this historic castle, which makes me a Laird Of The Castle.

        I will seek out your post on Donnie Munro soon, when I have a few minutes of uninterrupted reading time. Very interesting what he’s up to now. All I know is, I now have a craving for tablet. 😀

        Like

      • Alyson
        March 3, 2017

        Well, well – The Laird of Dunans Castle. We actually have a small business creating Clan Crest apparel for the various Lairds and Clan Chiefs here in Scotland – If you ever need anything to wear with your kilt…..!!

        Yes I wrote about Runrig last year and then did a 3-part series on Deacon Blue, Danny Wilson and Hue and Cry. Lots of connections as with the previous bands mentioned – definitely a case of 6 degrees of separation here or perhaps more like 2 or 3!

        Like

      • I was a groomsman at my Scottish friends’ wedding a few years ago and I got to wear a kilt for the first (and so far only) time. I think I pulled off that look. Having the wedding on the (bonnie bonnie) banks of Loch Lomond was an incredible experience for my wife & me. I really have to make time to check out these posts of yours. I promise I will do so soon.

        Like

      • Alyson
        March 3, 2017

        Last reply, promise, but I do like the sound of the wedding at Loch Lomond – As I say we’re in the business of supplying all the bits and bobs that go with kilt outfits and know how smart it can look. No obligation to check out the posts as I know just how time consuming it can be but in my Runrig post I shared a clip of them from their big outdoor concert at Loch Lomond whilst singing the song Loch Lomond.

        Here’s the link to save time searching but only if you have time – no pressure!
        https://jukeboxtimemachine.com/2016/03/14/loch-lomond-1991/

        Like

      • No need for this to be your last reply (unless you’ve grown tired of our conversation…hehe). I’ve seen that live Runrig performance but will watch it again when I read the post. Oh how I love “The Cutter And The Clan.” That might have been my first Runrig album.

        As for the bits & bobs you supply, perhaps I wore some of them at that wedding. If so, thanks for making me as Scottish as an American can possibly look.

        Liked by 1 person

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