KamerTunesBlog

Revisiting my extensive music collection, one artist at a time

Forty Year Friday – PINK FLOYD “ANIMALS”

Artist: PINK FLOYD
Album: ANIMALS

[Welcome to Forty Year Friday, the weekly series on my favorite albums of 1977]

pink-floyd-animalsFor my 11th birthday a friend gave me Kiss’ Rock And Roll Over LP, the predecessor to last week’s featured album, Love Gun. Kiss was my favorite band so I owned all of their albums, which meant I could exchange it for something else. I had heard about two bands that were supposed to be great, Led Zeppelin & Pink Floyd, and decided I would come home with an album by one of them. There were too many Zeppelin albums to choose from & I didn’t know where to start, but for some reason the only Pink Floyd album in stock was their latest release, Animals, so that’s the one I chose. By 1979 these would be my two favorite artists (and remain so today) but for a couple of years this was the only record I owned by either of them. It was drastically different from anything I had heard before. I was used to having five short songs (usually under 5 minutes) on each side of a record, with clearly defined verses, choruses & guitar solos. Instead, here were three long tracks (clocking in between 10 & 17 minutes each) bookended by two brief acoustic songs. Keep in mind that I was completely unaware of the two commercial behemoths that came before, The Dark Side Of The Moon and Wish You Were Here, let alone their earlier, more experimental & psychedelic music, so I could only compare Animals to the small collection of albums I owned at the time.

pink-floyd-animals-inner-gatefold-sleeve

I didn’t understand the socio-political Orwellian concept of animals representing particular types of people (courtesy of bassist/co-vocalist/main lyricist Roger Waters), so most of the lyrics went over my head, but the cover image of a giant pig floating by England’s Battersea Power Station had me captivated, as did the first swear word I ever heard on a record: “You f**ked up old hag…” from “Pigs (Three Different Ones).” This was the song that immediately captured my attention, for the music as much as the lyrics. The tempo shifts, atmospheric sections, Nick Mason’s hypnotic drumming, various sound effects & David Gilmour’s biting-yet-melodic guitar solos were the ideal gateway for me into the world of Pink Floyd. “Dogs” is the longest song, with several incredible guitar solos punctuating the mostly glacial pace. I love how Waters takes over vocal duties from Gilmour toward the end of the track, the latter’s smoother, more welcoming tones replaced by the former’s more biting, sinister approach. “Sheep” begins with keyboardist Rick Wright’s subtle Fender Rhodes piano before shifting into the most driving rhythm on the album. My favorite feature on this track is the way Waters’ vocal at the end of certain lines morphs into Wright’s synthesizer line. It’s often hard to hear where one ends & the other begins. The aforementioned acoustic tracks were parts one & two of “Pigs On The Wing,” the only lighthearted “love” songs among the darkness & anger. I recently learned that the 8-track tape of Animals included an additional guitar solo, played by Snowy White (who would join them on the subsequent tour). This extended version is highlighted below. It’s a shame that Animals doesn’t have the same profile as many other albums in their discography, but that’s likely due to the lack of a radio hit. Otherwise, it’s every bit as essential as their better-known releases. It will always hold a special place in my heart as my first Pink Floyd album, and it still sounds just as fresh four decades later.

Check out Wardo’s blog for an excellent overview of this album.

 

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65 comments on “Forty Year Friday – PINK FLOYD “ANIMALS”

  1. stephen1001
    January 13, 2017

    There’s something special about these ‘gateway’ albums to eventual favourite bands!

    Like

  2. partsocaster
    January 13, 2017

    A super band, a super album and a super post, nicely done!

    Like

    • Thank you, Kristiaan. It’s always a pleasure to find other enthusiastic Pink Floyd fans, especially the ones who appreciate their under-exposed albums.

      Like

  3. Phillip Helbig
    January 13, 2017

    “It’s a shame that Animals doesn’t have the same profile as many other albums in their discography, but that’s likely due to the lack of a radio hit. Otherwise, it’s every bit as essential as their better-known releases.”

    I own all the Floyd albums. I have all with Waters on vinyl, and all on CD in the sensible boxed set, and the last one which came out later. I also have a few on individual CDs. I’ve heard them all. I admit that Animals is rather far down on my list. I’ll give it another spin. (Jethro Tull’s Stormwatch was also once way down on my list, but I started liking it after hearing it a few times.) I think that one reason are the explicitly political lyrics. Not that a disagree with the sentiment; the question is what is good for a lyric.

    Like

    • Phillip Helbig
      January 13, 2017

      “sensible boxed set”

      Isn’t one set of remastered CDs enough? And if there are rarities etc for the fans, why not release just these, and not the original album again, which anyone interested in the “immersion edition” will have anyway (probably more than one copy). Jethro Tull did the correct thing with Nightcap.

      There is some justification for including extra tracks on remastered CDs, especially since newer technology allows more time on a CD than back in the day. Double dipping is not a problem here, since most interested in such rare tracks would also be interested in substantially better sounding CDs. But this is something which should be done only once.

      Of all bands, certainly Floyd don’t need the money. They are one of the few rock bands who were rich before they were even in a band.

      Like

      • I agree that in a perfect world, we shouldn’t have to buy & re-buy the same thing, and then be forced to buy it again when it’s been expanded, enhanced and “deluxe-ified.” But I also understand how the music business works and I don’t let the artists’ & record labels’ business decisions affect my enjoyment of the music. That’s why I had no problem buying the clearly-overpriced “Early Years” Floyd box set last year. Fans who only want the individual parts of that set are supposed to have access to them separately this year…other than one set of rarities that only us lunatics who spent that money will have (along with internet pirates, of course).

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    • Hi Phillip. I can understand why some fans wouldn’t be as passionate about Animals as some of their other albums. It’s dark, dense &…as I pointed out in the quote you referenced…doesn’t have a radio hit to anchor it. Tull’s Stormwatch is an excellent comparison. It didn’t immediately grab me when I heard it in high school but it gets better each time I play it.

      Like

  4. Victim of the Fury
    January 13, 2017

    Wonderfully done. An album I feel I know well and yet your review made me want to listen to it with fresh ears and your words open in front of me so I could “hear” what you hear.

    I had no idea about the Snowy White 8-track solo or the touring gig, unknown unknowns that I didn’t know I so much wanted to know. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m glad this post pointed you in the possible direction of listening to Animals with fresh ears. Would love to know how it sounds the next time you play it. It’s also nice to know that I unknowingly presented you with some previously unknown knowledge. 😀 The Snowy White tidbit was news to me until a week or two ago.

      Like

  5. Murphy's Law
    January 13, 2017

    An overlooked album in the Floyd canon. I bought it without hearing any of it just because it was between Wish You Were Here and The Wall, and it stayed in my study rotatation for years.

    Like

    • Animals seems like a no-brainer for anyone who enjoys Wish You Were Here and The Wall. It’s not that far removed from those records and has elements of both while also sounding like nothing else in their catalog. Not many artists could pull that off.

      Like

  6. Dean Vincent Micheli
    January 13, 2017

    My first Pink Floyd album, and for the longest time my favorite (now I would rank WYWH as my #1).
    Saw Roger Waters at Desert Trip in October, and thrilled me by playing Dogs and Pigs (Three Different Ones) in front of a stage that recreated the Battersea cover.

    Like

    • Hi Dean. It’s hard for me to rank my favorite Floyd albums since almost any of them could be at the top of my list at any given time, so I give you credit for being able to choose a favorite. Consider yourself fortunate to have seen Waters perform those songs from Animals. I saw him twice in the ’80s (on the Pros & Cons of Hitchhiking and Radio KAOS tours). I don’t recall every song he did those nights but I think he might have played one Animals song back then. When I saw Floyd in ’87 they skipped the album entirely.

      Like

  7. Kevin
    January 13, 2017

    I’ve always felt that I was in the minority of PF fans in that Animals and The Final Cut were my two favorite albums. Animals has a bit more bite to it (pun not intended, but not bad), than previous albums. “Dogs'” is my absolute favorite PF song and the first time I heard it was on an episode of WKRP In Cincinnati. Even though I only heard a brief excerpt, it was enough for me to save my allowance and buy that record. The final verse, with Waters sneering “who was born in a house full of pain…” is epic. Those harmony guitar solos are heaven. This record never got old for me. It was my first PF album and I still listen to it fairly often.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Kevin. You might still be in the minority but we’re both in that group. I love The Final Cut even though it often sounds like more of a Waters solo effort.

      I think I remember hearing “Dogs” on WKRP. It’s too bad they didn’t get the music rights to any of those songs for home video. I heard the DVD release of the complete series features almost all substituted (and inferior) music.

      Oh, and I completely agree about how epic those sneering vocals are, along with the guitar work on that song. The whole album is a masterpiece.

      Like

      • Kevin
        January 15, 2017

        Hi Rich. I bought that WKRP DVD series a few years ago. They obtained the rights to about half of the original music (the last episode I watched used The Who’s “Had Enough”), the rest is generic “sound-alike” music – including some slow moody music disguised as “Dogs.”

        You are right; the whole album is a masterpiece. I never saw PF live, but I saw Waters on his Radio KAOS tour in ’87 and have a vague memory of him playing “Pigs {Three Different Ones).”

        Like

      • I didn’t realize the WKRP DVD included as much as half the original music. That’s not bad for an old series that was likely not going to sell in numbers that would make financial sense. Were there any moments where the characters reference a specific artist/song that was then replaced by a sound-alike? That would be a little jarring for us music obsessives. It’s how I feel every time I watch Wayne’s World. In the scene where Wayne finally buys the guitar, the sales clerk points to a “No Stairway To Heaven” sign even though that was clearly not what he was playing.

        I’m a huge fan of Freaks & Geeks and was thrilled when they secured rights to all of the original music when it was released on DVD. I was one of the lunatics who bought the yearbook edition directly from the video company (which was later given a general release at a lower price). Judd Apatow and Paul Feig did such an amazing job interweaving music into that series.

        You’re probably right that Waters played “Pigs” in ’87 even though I should remember that vividly. I was such a huge Radio KAOS fan (still am) so I was just as excited to hear that material as the Floyd songs.

        Like

      • Kevin
        January 19, 2017

        I had read that WKRP edited out some scenes that refer to music that was left out, but I haven’t really noticed any glaring gaps in dialog.

        I never saw Freaks and Geeks but heard great things about it. I noticed there are some episodes on YouTube. I’ll check them out.

        You mentioned that The Final Cut is basically a Waters solo album, which is obviously accurate. I would argue (not that I’m looking for an argument) that it is more of an authentic PF album than Momentary Lapse… which utilizes about 15 session musicians (three drummers!) and an obvious production that is trying to sound Floydian. I believe Ezrin was brought in specifically for that reason. At least The Final Cut isn’t trying to be anything other than what it is, and often, that’s not too dissimilar from much of The Wall.

        Like

      • I imagine you’ll find a lot to love on Freaks & Geeks. Start with the pilot episode. It’s a classic that ends with Styx.

        All good points about The Final Cut and Momentary Lapse. I love them both equally yet they couldn’t be more different. I have more of a connection to Gilmour’s guitar & voice than I do to Waters’ lyrics, so I tend to have a stronger opinion of the post Waters albums than many fans. Not sure if I mentioned this already, but I saw Waters & Floyd four months apart in ’87 at Madison Square Garden, in almost the exact same seats. As great as Floyd was I enjoyed the Waters show even more. I guess my obsession with Radio KAOS at the time probably had something to do with it.

        Like

      • Kevin
        January 19, 2017

        That Radio KAOS tour was great. Interesting that you saw it at MSG. When he came to Boston, he played a smaller amphitheater (which I think might have been better than at the bigger Boston Garden). I remember it was quadraphonic, with speakers behind the audience. I also remember reading interviews with him at the time complaining that he was playing smaller places while “Pink Floyd” were playing arenas and stadiums. I think he underestimated how well a Waters-less Floyd would do.

        Like

      • I think he also used that quadrophonic system on the Pros & Cons Of Hitchhiking tour, which I saw at the Meadowlands Arena in New Jersey. I’m glad I was able to see him & Floyd at the same venue in the same year. It made comparisons very easy. The Floyd show was great but “safe” while Waters really put on a spectacle. Had Floyd performed “Echoes” I might have felt differently. I shouted for that song the entire concert, as if Gilmour was going to hear my request and play it just for me. Haha.

        Like

  8. 80smetalman
    January 13, 2017

    I like this album but I couldn’t play it in the car because my ex wife said it was music to slice your wrists to. I’ve heard it hundreds of times and have never contemplated doing that.

    Like

    • Animals is certainly not for casual fans & people with severe emotional issues, so your wife has a point. Haha. I’m glad her ruling hasn’t kept you from enjoying hundreds of listens to this incredible record.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. J.
    January 13, 2017

    Wonderful, Rich. I think this was the second Pink Floyd album I heard (Dark Side of the Moon being the first). Had forgotten all about it till recently, actually, and I’ve been getting back into it, so this is a timely review.

    Like

    • Thanks, J. I’ve often wondered how I would have felt about Animals had I only heard it after I knew The Dark Side Of The Moon. I think I would still love it since they’re such an important band for me, but I’ve always enjoyed the special relationship I have with it simply because it was my first exposure to their music when I was so young. I hope it holds up for you the next time you play it.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Vinyl Connection
    January 13, 2017

    Terrific piece. I recall that after the romantic lushness of Wish You Were Here, it took me a little while to ‘get’ Animals, but when it did click, it became a Floyd favourite, a place it still holds. Cheers.

    Like

    • Thanks, Bruce. I never really thought of Wish You Were Here as “romantic” &/or “lush,” but it could certainly be described that way when compared to Animals or The Wall. I guess that’s due to the angularity of tracks like “Have A Cigar” and “Welcome To The Machine,” but I guess I understand what you mean when I think about “Shine On You Crazy Diamond.” Happy to know you’re also a fan of Animals. I like when we find more common ground.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Daddydinorawk
    January 13, 2017

    My. Favorite. Album.

    Like

  12. 2loud2oldmusic
    January 13, 2017

    Nice one! I was given a box of old records by my brother-in-law and this one was in there. I haven’t listened to it yet. I just might need to give it a spin sooner rather than later.

    Like

    • Consider yourself extremely fortunate to have received Animals among those hand-me-down albums. I would love to know how you feel about it whenever you have a chance to give it a listen.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Yahooey
    January 14, 2017

    The tricks the mind plays. Because of its lack of hits, mentally I always place Animals as from before Dark Side.

    Like

    • I could see how, if you weren’t familiar with the Floyd discography and came to it after all the radio hits, you might think that Animals was part of their run of hugely successful albums. Of course, musically it fits right in with what they did right before & after it. It also sold more than 4 million copies in the US so it was hardly a dud, but it does get forgotten when compared to their other mega-million-selling albums in the ’70s.

      Like

      • Yahooey
        January 16, 2017

        It’s a case of first impressions. It came out before I was aware of their discography. Everyone I new/had Dark Side and Wish You Were Her but only the fans had the earlier stuff. By the time The Wall came out I knew better but that early categorization stuck and if I don’t pause to think about it, I will still associate it with pre-Moon Floyd.

        Like

      • It makes sense that you would think of Animals as pre-Dark Side based on when you discovered them. It proves that a good radio-ready single can make a big difference in perception & awareness. It’s hard to imagine anything radio-friendly being on that album, in spite of how great it is.

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Jeff Kempin
    January 14, 2017

    My wife is a HUGE PF fan and this is one of her favorites. I’m just a big PF fan, but I like Animals too. It was the last album of theirs that I bought and was the least familiar with because, as you said, there was no big radio hit like there were from their other albums. I thought FM radio allowed for longer cuts to be played by 1977? Any way you slice it, there’s a lot of great music here.

    Like

    • Hi Jeff. Your wife clearly has incredible taste in music (as do you, of course). 😀 You’re right that FM radio allowed & often encouraged the playing of long & more challenging songs, but for some reason the songs from Animals never caught on in a big way with listeners. Now all those stations are playlisted and every classic rock artists has been boiled down to a handful of songs that get played & played some more while other equally deserving songs get ignored. At least on commercial radio.

      Like

  15. 1537
    January 14, 2017

    What a great LP to hear your first musical swearing on! Thinking about it, there is every chance it was mine too.

    Like

  16. Alyson (WIAA,A?)
    January 14, 2017

    This is one that my husband and his brother had I know but didn’t really discover them until a lot later. Looking forward to what else comes up in this thread though as bound to be some of my favourites.

    Like

    • Are you familiar with this album, Alyson, or are you more of a casual Pink Floyd fan? Thanks for checking in. I hope we have some more ’77 releases in common as this series progresses.

      Like

      • Alyson (WIAA,A?)
        January 16, 2017

        As I mentioned before, I am looking forward to seeing what pops up on this thread as 1977 was the year I probably listened to music more than in any other – I was however aged 16/17, and female, so in the main the kind of stuff we were into just wasn’t the same as that listened to by the boys we knew of the same age i.e. Pink Floyd. There was a degree of overlap however and that’s why I’m going to keep dropping by this fine place just to see if it overlaps with what you were listening to across the pond.

        As for Pink Floyd, I really didn’t “get” them until they briefly reformed for the Live 8 concert in London in 2005 – Best performance of the day I felt. Also the album cover has some iconic artwork so recognise that too but as for the content, not so much. I did a post for my blog some time ago about first albums and mentioned that I was very sceptical about those people who said their first purchase was something very “cool” like Pink Floyd – I stand corrected! My first album was by Elvis by the way (I was aged 9) and it turns out that was also quite “cool” although I had always thought otherwise!

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      • It’s always so much fun to compare music from a particular era with people that are older or younger than me. Sometimes just a couple of years age difference can result in drastically varying opinions. When Kiss broke big in ’75/’76 I was the perfect age (9/10). Had I been 15 or 16 I doubt I would have taken them seriously.

        I didn’t see a lot of the Live 8 concert but I made sure I caught that Pink Floyd performance. I don’t remember if I openly wept but I came close to having tears in my eyes, seeing the four of them on stage together. More than The Eagles with their “Hell Freezes Over” reunion, there was so much bad blood between Waters & Gilmour that I never dreamed they would perform together again. The fact that they sounded so good (despite Waters’ raspier-than-usual vocals) is testament to the talent those guys have. It’s a shame Rick Wright is no longer with us. Another “reunion” would never be the same.

        I have to find your “first albums” post. Animals wasn’t my first (Kiss and Stevie Wonder preceded it, and possibly Steve Miller’s Fly Like An Eagle), but I’ve always been pleased that I chose a lesser-known Pink Floyd album at such a young age. As for Elvis, he will always be cool. Which album was your first?

        Like

      • Alyson (WIAA,A?)
        January 18, 2017

        Glad you enjoyed Live 8 – it was special. I see you found my first album post so I’ll pop back to my place and reply there. Also see I’ve prompted another comment below so will come back later to read it properly. I am a tad perplexed at the lack of female bloggers who like revisiting the music of their youth – If you know of anyone, send them my way!

        Like

      • I’ve also been surprised & disappointed that there aren’t many female music bloggers. I know obsessive music collecting has long been a “guy thing,” but lots of women love music & writing, so I wish more of them would combine the two. Danica Piche at the Living A Beautiful Life blog is one of my favorites, although her focus is mostly on short stories with occasional excursions into the musical realm.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Alyson (WIAA,A?)
        January 18, 2017

        Thanks for the heads up about Danica – will investigate.

        Like

      • Phillip Helbig
        January 18, 2017

        “I was however aged 16/17, and female, so in the main the kind of stuff we were into just wasn’t the same as that listened to by the boys we knew of the same age i.e. Pink Floyd”

        Yes, there was a huge range of music in the 1970s, from Donny and Marie Osmond to Black Sabbath, from Roger Whittaker to The Clash. I remember an interview with someone (don’t rememember whom) who said that he would like to see a festival with Iron Maiden, the Eurythmics, and Paul Young. The interviewer laughed, then the interviewee pointed out that, in its time, Woodstock was essentially the same thing. Anyway, 16/17 and female in the late 1970s reminds me of many stories, but I’ll share only one here. 🙂 A true one, but not involving myself.

        At a Floyd concert for The Wall, a fan spots Toni Tennille, she of The Captain and Tennille fame, in the audience. Although he immediately regrets that his utterance showed that he knew who she was, he blurts out “What are you doing here?”. She replies “I sang on the album!” Dude freaks out. For whatever reason, his friend has the album with him. He checks the credits and sees her name. Sheepishly, he comes back to her: “Can I have your autograph?”

        Another “ooh-aah” singer on the album was Bruce Johnston, of Beach Boys fame. If, like Floyd (as one of the few progressive groups), you have backing vocals, go with the best!

        Like

      • Great points about the ’70s being a real musical melting pot, Phillip. I suppose the same can be said for every decade, but I think there was more diversity among popular (not just pop) music in the ’70s than any time before or since. That’s an interesting tidbit about that “Woodstock” interview. Very perceptive interviewee.

        I remember poring over the credits in The Wall and being perplexed by appearances from Toni Tennille and Bruce Johnston. My 13-yeard-old brain couldn’t comprehend a music meeting of Pink Floyd, The Beach Boys and Captain & Tennille. It wasn’t long before it all made sense to me. As you said, the best (and smartest) musicians always “go with the best.”

        Like

  17. Alyson (WIAA,A?)
    January 18, 2017

    Sorry but can’t find the reply section to Phillip Helbig but thanks for taking on board my comment – Yes in every decade there is a wide range of popular music but by the late ’70s it was as extreme as it gets I think – I did a post about the year 1976 and that year in the UK we had Disco (Tina Charles, Donna Summer), Punk (Sex Pistols, the Clash), Country (JJ Barrie, Pussycat and Billie Jo Spears), Novelty songs (The Wurzels), Soft rock (Chicago, Dr Hook), Pop classics (Elton John & Kiki Dee), Soul (The Stylistics, Barry White), Rock (Queen with their amazing Bohemian Rhapsody) and Rock ‘n’ Roll Revival acts (Showaddywaddy). And that’s what I love about music! There is always something for everyone and if you are open-minded about it all you will find something to pique your interest in any genre/sub-genre. I am loving looking back from the perspective of being the age I am now because it is possible to learn so much more of the back story to the artists/albums and to hear the music again with fresh ears. Am loving the music blogosphere as well, but wish there were more females! Sorry a long comment again and am filling up Rich’s space but look forward to returning when the musical X and Y chromosomes overlap!

    Like

    • Great comment, Alyson. I agree with everything you wrote, especially about needing more females in the musical blogosphere. I’m sure Phillip will see your comment here. We keep pushing him to start his own blog but that hasn’t happened yet. Looking forward to that X/Y chromosome overlap. Perhaps it’ll happen this Friday.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Phillip Helbig
        January 19, 2017

        Yes, blogging will start soon. 😐 First few posts might be about reasons it has taken so long. 🙂

        Saw Wishbone Ash last night. As ever, a good concert if you like Wishbone Ash.

        Opening act was Steve Hill, a one-man band from Canada. I’ve seen other singing guitarists play some drums and hi-hat via pedals, but he also had a piece of a drumstick mounted on the headstock of his guitar so that he could hit cymbals as well.

        Upcoming concerts: Iron Maiden, Foreigner, John Mayall (will be 84 this year!), Walter Trout.

        Like

      • Interesting concept to start your blog with an explanation for the delay in starting a blog. Looking forward to it.

        I’m not an expert on Wishbone Ash or their various lineups, but I have Argus, a 2-CD compilation and a couple of other albums (including a live one) on LP. I have no doubt with that catalog any lineup would be worth seeing. Your upcoming concert schedule looks good. The only show on my calendar so far is The Zombies.

        Like

  18. Phillip Helbig
    January 19, 2017

    test

    Like

  19. wardo
    January 19, 2017

    I left a thank you the other day, but I don’t see it. So I’ll say it again: thanks for the shout-out!

    Like

  20. Tangled Up In Music
    January 21, 2017

    Their best in my opinion. Incredible music, incredible lyrics and perfect balance between them before Waters’ concepts got too heavy (though I love Wall and Cut too). The moments you mentioned when the vocals go into the keyboards in Sheep are genius.

    Like

    • I’m glad we agree on this one, Ovidiu, after we differed on so many of my 1986 choices last year. Thanks for confirming how cool that segue from vocal to synth on “Sheep” is.

      Liked by 1 person

  21. boppinsblog
    January 22, 2017

    Nice post. This is my 3rd favourite Pink Floyd album. Being barely nudged out by The Wall and Wish You Were Here. I love the bass work, the keys, the drums, the guitar work, the talkbox, the cowbell, the grunts, snorts and baas.

    Like

    • I’m pleased to know you rank Animals so high on your list of PF favorites, and I completely agree with your list of the reasons why it’s so great. Well done. Certainly the best collection of grunts, snorts & baas on a single album. 😀

      Like

  22. samurai290463
    March 10, 2017

    I loved this album when it came out. I was 14 years old and my best friend and I used to listen to it over and over again on his Grundig stereo hifi . It was incredible. Skip 30 or so years forward and imagine my surprise when I heard Roger Waters in a radio interview say ” That Animals is full of errors” !!!
    Now if I listen to the album I can hear what might be some errors but I enjoy them. It gives the album a raw quality. One that the whole sound hasn’t been over managed and mixed.
    Then when you think it’s all over and they can’t get any better ….. Pink Floyd bring out THE WALL
    Nice post thank you.
    If you like Floyd check out The Autoset
    Perfect Isolation .
    It’s all over the Web

    Like

    • Thanks for stopping by & sharing your experiences with this amazing album. You were a few years older than me (still are, apparently 😀 ) but we were both struck by it in the same way. It’s hard for me to pick a favorite Pink Floyd album since most of them have been hugely important to me, but on any given day I could argue that Animals is #1. What is The Autoset Perfect Isolation?

      Best…
      Rich

      Liked by 1 person

      • samurai290463
        March 13, 2017

        The Autoset are a Pink Floyd inspired band from Hatfield in the U.K. .
        So far they have released just one Album called Perfect Isolation. Which is on ITunes, Deezer,Napster, etc.
        Here’s a link to their website: http://theautoset.wix.com/mysite.
        You can find them just typing The Autoset in your browser.
        The Album is a concept Album about a man who has Schizophrenia and you are taken on his journey through love, torment, murder, incarceration and suicide.
        It’s happy upbeat little number lol😆😆😆.
        If you find it let me know what you think.
        Regards Lee

        Like

      • Thanks, Lee. I will check it out. I’m guessing this is your band(?).

        Like

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