KamerTunesBlog

Revisiting my extensive music collection, one artist at a time

Thirty Year Thursday – IRON MAIDEN “SOMEWHERE IN TIME”

[Welcome to Thirty Year Thursday, the weekly series on my favorite albums of 1986, which now shifts to the releases I didn’t discover until after 1986]

Artist: IRON MAIDEN
Album: SOMEWHERE IN TIME

iron-maiden-somewhere-in-timeOne of the great musical joys of my life was “discovering” Iron Maiden when I was in my early 30s. A band I should have loved in high school when they emerged as the standard bearers of the New Wave Of British Heavy Metal (or NWOBHM, which really rolls off the tongue), for some reason I didn’t join my friends in their adulation of Maiden in spite of the captivating album covers and heavy, anthemic music. It took a visit to a used record store around ’97 or ’98 to open my eyes. I purchased four of their early classics on LP for around $1-$2 each (this was well before the vinyl resurgence that made such bargains a thing of the past), and my jaw hit the floor as I laid my ears on Killers, The Number Of The Beast, Piece Of Mind and Live After Death for the first time later that day. Within a year I owned their entire catalog on CD, saw them in concert (with returning vocalist Bruce Dickinson) and I was as passionate about them as many artists I had been listening to for decades. I’ve been eager to tackle their discography for an Iron Maiden “complete albums” series but I haven’t had the time. Until I get to that, I can at least share my love of their music as I discuss their 1986 album, Somewhere In Time, in honor of its 30th anniversary.

This isn’t one of my most-played Maiden albums but I got reacquainted with it this past week. They wrote & recorded it in the aftermath of a grueling world tour in support of the brilliant Powerslave and, even though it didn’t live up to its predecessor (or any of their earlier releases), they still delivered enough new classics to make it another essential release. Although Dickinson’s “air raid siren” voice is as strong as ever, he was physically & mentally wiped out & didn’t bring in any of his own material. Bassist/bandleader Steve Harris wrote or co-wrote 5 of the 8 songs, while guitarists Adrian Smith and Dave Murray contributed iron-maiden-image-from-somewhere-in-timethe rest. The original Side 1 includes three fantastic songs. Album opener “Caught Somewhere In Time,” with the expected galloping rhythm, introduces guitar synthesizers to the mix for the first time. These undoubtedly alienated some fans but they fit seamlessly into the Maiden sound. “Wasted Years,” the first single release and one of the album’s shortest songs, is a driving melodic metal track with a catchy chorus. “Heaven Can Wait” features another catchy chorus as well as a chant-along section in the middle that surely came alive with thousands of fans joining in. Side 2 is bookended by two epics: “The Loneliness Of The Long Distance Runner” and “Alexander The Great (356-323 B.C.).” Both showcase Harris’ love of prog-rock with various shifts in tempo & mood, as well as incredible guitar shredding and Dickinson’s impressive pipes. Even though they’re each missing a hook to separate them from other Maiden epics, it’s hard to complain when they sound so good. “Stranger In A Strange Land” has an almost-funky groove, and the combination of synths, fuzzy guitars and catchy melodies make this possibly their most radio-friendly, mainstream metal song. “Deja-Vu” condenses all that’s great about the band, with rumbling bass and their twin guitar attack, in just under 5 minutes. Somewhere In Time is an excellent album that only pales slightly when compared to the greatness that came before it (as well as the masterpiece they would unleash two years later). Otherwise it’s certainly one of the best releases of 1986.

For a more detailed analysis of this album from one of the world’s (and certainly Canada’s) biggest Maiden fans, check out this post from Mike Ladano.

Advertisements

74 comments on “Thirty Year Thursday – IRON MAIDEN “SOMEWHERE IN TIME”

  1. Arlee Bird
    September 15, 2016

    I discovered the music of Iron Maiden when I purchased this album on cassette tape shortly after it was released. I had avoided previous efforts by the band and then was lured to this album. I’m glad I got it. It’s a fine album that gave me a lot of listening pleasure in the years after I acquired it. Haven’t listened to this album in many years now.

    Arlee Bird
    Tossing It Out

    Like

    • Hi Arlee. This seems like an interesting introduction to Maiden’s music, since they have several others that most fans would recommend to people just discovering them. Then again, it also has some of their most commercial, radio-friendly songs so perhaps it’s a good choice for certain listeners. Glad you enjoyed it. Did you ever delve any further into their discography?

      Like

      • Arlee Bird
        September 16, 2016

        No, that’s the only album of their’s I’ve heard. Oddly, though I liked that album immensely, I still haven’t been drawn to any of their other efforts. Then again the heavy metal genre is not music that I listen to with any regularity.

        Like

      • Thanks for following up. If this genre isn’t your usual thing then you probably don’t need to delve any further, but if you ever revisit it and rekindle your interest, there are at least 6-7 other Maiden albums that you would likely enjoy just as much as this one.

        Like

  2. mikeladano
    September 16, 2016

    Thanks for the linky, Rich!

    30 years?? I got this is Grade 9. The video for Wasted Years had just come out. The album defined my grade 9 year. Kiss didn’t have a new record out, but Maiden did. I even used the lyrics for Alexander the Great for an art project!

    Like

    • Hi Mike. I’m happy to give your excellent blog a shout-out whenever I can, and of course your series on Maiden is as thorough as it gets. Hopefully you’ll get tens & tens of additional readers over the years. Haha.

      Your comment about this album coming out when you were in Grade 9 has me singing the Barenaked Ladies song of the same name. It’s hard to believe their debut album is almost 25(!) years old. How is that possible?

      Liked by 1 person

      • mikeladano
        September 17, 2016

        Barenaked Ladies — you’re making me feel old! The year I started University, BNL were the band who played Frosh Week at University of Waterloo. The reviews were fairly weak! I didn’t think they’d go anywhere!

        Like

      • We weren’t aware of BNL here until Gordon was released (in ’92, I believe). Saw them open up for someone else (Peter Himmelman, possibly) and I was completely blown away. Sure they were silly, but they had great songs and the musicianship was outstanding. Saw them every time they came to New York for the next several years, until the quality of their albums started to slip. I eventually came back around to them and still think they’re a fantastic band. And yes, we’re both old…but take comfort in the fact that I’m older than you.

        Like

  3. stephen1001
    September 16, 2016

    Sadly you’re right Rich, A Maiden LP for $1 would certainly be unheard of these days – even without the actual LP, I’d imagine vendors could probably ask for quite a bit more for the artwork alone!

    Like

    • Hi Geoff. It’s amazing how difficult it is to find good vinyl bargains, and it’s been that way for at least the last 5 years. I don’t get the whole fetishization of vinyl, but I never stopped listening to that format so for me it’s never gone away. Seems like there are a lot of people who sold their albums & turntables 20 years ago and are now rebuying everything they sold…for a lot more than they sold them for. I’m glad they’re happy but it’s made record shopping (especially bargain hunting) a lot less fun for me.

      Good point about Maiden album sleeves likely selling for more than I paid for those LPs.

      Like

  4. Murphy's Law
    September 16, 2016

    Oh, the arguments about guitar synths! Judas Priest began using them around the same time and there was a lot of debate – not many people are more opinionated or argumentative than high school metal fans.

    Like

    • Very true about high school metal fans, but it also applies to a lot of “grown up” metal fans too. I remember a lot of them nit-picking everything I wrote in my Metallica series a few years ago. Usually people enjoy comparing notes, recounting their first experience with certain albums, etc., but those people disputed my impressions of certain lyrics as if their impression was the only one that’s valid.

      I have no problem with synths, and in the right context they can really enhance an artist’s sound. I think that was the case with Maiden. I remember how Queen always made it a point to state how no synths were used on their albums…until The Game, when they took their sound to a new level for a new decade. That worked out pretty well for them, eh?

      Like

  5. Phillip Helbig
    September 16, 2016

    Glad you’re finally getting around to Maiden, if only a bit.

    Since I listen to a lot of prog (not so much Yes/ELP/Crimson (except the early Crimson stuff)/Genesis—more Tull, Floyd, Rush), many people suggested that this album and its sequel (Seventh Son of a Seventh Son) would be the best ones for me. Actually, while I agree that it is probably the best album of 1986, and while it is good compared to almost any other album in the world, I like other Maiden albums more: the 3 classic ones, the stuff after Dickinson rejoined, even the Blaze albums. I am atypical in that I would probably put Killers at the bottom of the list, and, while it has some good songs on it, don’t rate the first one that high either (in this sense, it is similar to the two albums with Bruce but without Smith).

    I’m about the same age as Rich and discovered Maiden only a few years ago, even though I’ve known that they existed and were quite famous since almost as long as they have been around. It was probably their goofy image which put me off. The music is really, really, good, up there with my other favourite bands, and the lyrics, while not attaining the level of, say, Ian Anderson, Neil Peart or even Roger Waters, is still head and shoulders above almost everything else in metal or, for that matter, in all of music.

    Another thing to keep in mind: I am not exaggerating when I claim that there is more variety among heavy metal than in the rest of music combined. Maiden, while the quintessential heavy-metal band, are, to my ears, closer to 1970s hard rock (Rush—doesn’t “Revelations” sound just like something from a lost Rush album between Caress of Steel and 2112?—Wishbone Ash, Thin Lizzy, Scorpions, Uriah Heep, and so on) than to most other heavy-metal bands.

    Looking forward to your take on their entire discography.

    Like

    • Hi Phillip. I’m glad I was finally able to discuss Maiden here, even if it’s only one post about a single album. I really want to do a complete Maiden series but life is just too complicated right now. I’ve barely had the time for these weekly posts. As always you made some great points, especially about how Maiden could pass for ’70s hard rock as much as ’80s metal. Considering their influences, I’m guessing Steve Harris would be very pleased to hear you say that. I don’t feel as strongly as you do about certain albums, and I don’t know the Blaze Bayley albums well enough to form an opinion yet, but I do feel that, even though the Dickinson Mach II albums are all really good, some of them are needlessly long (songs & albums) and they get a little too repetitive at times. That’s only a minor complaint since I’m thrilled that they’ve continued making vital music after nearly 40 years. Long may they reign.

      Like

      • Phillip Helbig
        September 16, 2016

        “but I do feel that, even though the Dickinson Mach II albums are all really good, some of them are needlessly long (songs & albums) and they get a little too repetitive at times. That’s only a minor complaint since I’m thrilled that they’ve continued making vital music after nearly 40 years. Long may they reign.”

        Yes, I see the point, though a) there are some short songs and b) not all of the long songs are too repetitive.

        Even though some other bands have albums better than Maiden’s best, if only somewhat, I don’t think any other group has been consistently so good for so long.

        I wish they would hire Elton John or whoever as a special guest and play “Empire of the Clouds” live. Bruce said they never would, though presumably he (or Michael Kenney) could play the piano bit. OK, need a cello as well. But still. (Freddy Mercury showed that there is no contradiction between being a flamboyant front man and playing the piano.)

        Like

      • I agree that not every song is too long or too repetitive, but each album has at least a few songs that would have been stronger in shorter lengths. Of course there are also a number of songs on the later albums that rival the best stuff they did during their ’80s heyday.

        I agree that it wouldn’t hurt to add a piano live. Didn’t realize they had an aversion to that. In fact, they would be an ideal candidate for the band + orchestra treatment. Deep Purple, Metallica, Procol Harum and many others have done it, but I imagine Maiden’s music would soar in that setting.

        Like

      • Phillip Helbig
        September 16, 2016

        I don’t know if it was piano in general, or just this song; I just read that Dickinson said they wouldn’t play it live.

        Like

      • And who’s to argue with Bruce Bruce, right?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Daddydinorawk
        September 17, 2016

        Don’t you mean “THE” Bruce Dickinson?

        Like

      • Phillip Helbig
        September 19, 2016

        Don’t you mean “THE” Bruce Dickinson?

        Indeed. I hope that the metallic percussion on “Speed of Light” was chosen so that, during the next tour, Bruce can open the concert with “I am the real Bruce Dickinson, and I want—more cowbell!”.

        Like

      • I missed the SNL reference initially but now I love it. Of course my “Bruce Bruce” reference was regarding his stage name with Samson but I guess more people make the connection to that “more cowbell” sketch. I wonder how many albums Blue Oyster Cult sold to a younger generation as a result of that sketch.

        Like

  6. Kevin
    September 16, 2016

    As a teenager, I didn’t think I would like Maiden, as I wasn’t a fan of metal. Then, one of my ‘metal friends’ bought Live After Death and played it in his car at ear splitting levels – and it was awesome! I can understand why some IM fans were disappointed with Somewhere In Time. It is a bit watered down in comparison to the almighty Powerslave, Glossy production, guitar and bass synths! This stuff didn’t bother me too much, I thought it added some texture (I felt the same about Rush at this time also, but they might have taken the keyboard textures a bit too far). My ‘metal friends’ jumped off the Maiden voyage completely with the next album – on to Metallica, Megadeth, Slayer, etc. Not me. I didn’t make that leap. I loved Seventh Son Of A Seventh Son.

    Like

    • Once again we’re on a very similar wavelength, Kevin. By the time I got to Live After Death (after listening to the prior three albums in succession) I was completely blown away. It was one of those “where has this band been all my life?” moments (even though I knew about them since around 1980-81). Ironically, my late-in-life discovery of Maiden led me to all of the metal bands you mentioned, even though I know I wouldn’t have enjoyed them back in college (which coincided with those bands’ rise to prominence). As for Seventh Son…., hell yeah!!!

      Like

  7. 80smetalman
    September 16, 2016

    I remember back at the time that some people were calling this album Maiden’s “Turbo” on account of the synthesizers. I have to agree with you. It doesn’t rank up there with any of its predecessors but it’s a good album.

    Like

    • It’s interesting to hear about metal fans’ opinions from back in the day. While I understand their surprise (and dismay) about synths being added to their beloved genre, it’s not like Maiden & Priest became Thomas Dolby & Gary Numan (both of whom I like). The synths were just an added texture, and everything else about the music remained the same.

      Liked by 1 person

      • 80smetalman
        September 16, 2016

        Good point, you can’t compare Maiden or Priest to Thomas Dolby or Gary Numan, I like them too. I think that some saw the inclusion of synths as a sell out or tainting metal.

        Like

      • The whole “sell-out” complaint is so silly when you consider how many albums & concert tickets these bands had already sold. Artists need to progress and fans should do the same. I think people are a lot more open-minded now than they were back then.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Phillip Helbig
        September 16, 2016

        I agree in the case of Maiden, but Rush went too far. I have no problem with heavy synth music: Tangerine Dream, Jean-Michel Jarre, Wish You Were Here. Despite some good lyrics (arguably better in some ways than earlier ones), I think that 80s Rush music is not as good as what came before (or after).

        Like

      • I felt that way about Rush’s ’80s output…in the ’80s. Since then I’ve come around to those albums in a big way. It’s just an artist painting with new colors on a different canvas. I agree that they’ll never compare to the albums that came before them, or many of the later albums, but I still enjoy them a lot.

        Like

      • 80smetalman
        September 16, 2016

        I think they are too but there are still closed minded people out there. In 2009 at Bloodstock, Cradle of Filth got booed off stage because the crowd thought they had become too popular for Bloodstock.

        Like

      • Every generation needs to have its share of idiots. It’s the circle of life. 😀

        Liked by 1 person

      • 80smetalman
        September 16, 2016

        Yep 🙂

        Like

      • Kevin
        September 16, 2016

        Imagine a Thomas Dolby fronted Iron Maiden; “She Blinded Me With Satan.”

        Liked by 1 person

      • I love it. You might be on to something here. If they could combine metal with rap (in spite of how bad most of it was), why not metal and synth-pop?

        Like

      • Kevin
        September 16, 2016

        Metal/synth-pop! Actually, you’re almost describing the chorus to “Can I Play With Madness”

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hmm, “Can I Play With Madness” as metal/synth-pop? Possibly a stretch but I see what you’re going for.

        Like

      • Phillip Helbig
        September 16, 2016

        “I felt that way about Rush’s ’80s output…in the ’80s.”

        A bit more than a year ago, I listened to the live album from the Clockwork Angels tour (on which, apart from the eponymous album, they played mostly 80s stuff—much more than is usually the case). This was while driving back from the Cropredy festival. Still couldn’t get into it. It’s not bad, but not nearly as good.

        This year at Cropredy, I bought A Show of Hands along with some other used CDs and books. It’s actually not bad. Compared to almost anything else from the 1980s, it’s not bad, but of course I compare it to Moving Pictures and the three albums before that.

        Like

      • Of all their ’60s & ’70s live albums I feel like A Show Of Hands is the most synthetic-sounding, but when I’m in the mood for that era it does satisfy. I agree regarding that era compared to their ’70s & early-’80s output, but it’s almost unfair to make that comparison. I always enjoyed how their live albums, which for a couple of decades reflected the 4 albums that preceded them, marked particular eras in their career, with the occasional nod to older stuff. This conversation is putting me in the mood for Rush. Of course, that doesn’t take much.

        Like

      • Phillip Helbig
        September 16, 2016

        “Imagine a Thomas Dolby fronted Iron Maiden”

        I remember seeing an interview with Thomas Dolby (yes, his stage name is taken from the noise-reduction system!) where he said that in the future one would mostly hear his type of music. Then he added, well, one might be able to go to a small club and see a bloke with long hair and a shiny guitar.

        Like

      • Interesting quote from Mr. Dolby. Didn’t realize that wasn’t his real name. Thanks for the info.

        Like

      • Phillip Helbig
        September 21, 2016

        “You have a point there”

        Actually, since there is more than one hook, I have more than one point. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • Phillip Helbig
      September 16, 2016

      Turbo? Judas Priest lyrics:

      I’m your turbo lover
      Tell me there’s no other
      I’m your turbo lover
      Better run for cover

      I don’t think anything by Maiden descends that low. 😐

      Liked by 1 person

      • You’re probably right, but it was just one song. One of my favorite Zeppelin songs (“D’yer Maker”) has silly lyrics but it’s still great.

        Like

      • Daddydinorawk
        September 17, 2016

        Hooks in you, hooks in me, hooks in the ceiling
        For that well hung feeling
        No big deal, no big sin, strung up on love
        I got the hooks screwed in

        Like

      • Suddenly a new contender for inane metal lyrics has emerged. Well done, sir.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Phillip Helbig
        September 20, 2016

        At least there is a pun in Hooks.

        Like

      • You have a point there, Phillip. Some people hate puns but I consider them high art. Okay, perhaps medium art. Hehe.

        Like

  8. John Sturm
    September 16, 2016

    Great post Rich. This is actually one of most “go-to” albums for Maiden (the other 2 being Live After Death & 7th Son). I got into Maiden quite young, the artwork being the first thing that captured my imagination. Fortunately they had the tunes to back it up with! I’ve never been one of those “synths are bad” types of fan. To me, if it adds a texture or colour to a song – great! It probably also helped that I was 8/9 when I heard this album so things like that never really mattered to me. There’s a telling story to go hand in hand with the ‘Bruce was burnt out’ thread, in that he turned up the writing sessions for SIT with a bunch of acoustic songs and wanted the album to be a sort of unplugged style thing. Would have been interesting at that point in their career, for sure! I rarely skip a song on this album save – which to me marks it out for high quality material. I’m also (selfishly) hoping things settle down for you because I’d love to read your thoughts on the entire Maiden catalogue!

    Like

    • Hi John. It’s great to hear from you. The artwork oh this one is pretty spectacular, and I can imagine what an impact it would have on an 8-9 year old. Glad the synths didn’t bother you. I never really understand the hatred people had but I know metal fans can be very particular. I had heard about Bruce bringing in acoustic songs that the band had no interest in recording. I can’t even imagine an acoustic Maiden album…even though they would probably be great doing an “unplugged” set.

      I appreciate the good wishes and hopefully things will settle down in 2017 so I can tackle their discography.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Phillip Helbig
        September 20, 2016

        “I can’t even imagine an acoustic Maiden album…even though they would probably be great doing an “unplugged” set.”

        Check out the band Maiden uniteD (yes, silly name), mostly Dutch musicians who do acoustic maiden songs, often in a slower tempo as well. With Damien Wilson (who sings with Threshold and Headspace as well as having a career as a singer-songwriter) they have one of the best singers in the world. If Bruce ever retires, Maiden would make a big mistake if they don’t offer him the job.

        http://www.maidenunited.com/

        Like

      • I just checked out some clips from Maiden UniteD and they sound great. I will check out more of their music soon. Threshold never did much for me but I agree that Damien Wilson is an incredible singer.

        Like

      • Phillip Helbig
        September 21, 2016

        “I just checked out some clips from Maiden UniteD and they sound great. I will check out more of their music soon. Threshold never did much for me but I agree that Damien Wilson is an incredible singer.”

        Another group he sings with, Headspace, were at Cropredy this year. Adam Wakeman, one of Rick’s many children, on keyboards. Great technical ability and good singing, but the music didn’t move me. I like his singer-songwriter stuff better. With Maiden uniteD, of course it helps if one knows the original versions, but even if not, one can still appreciate his pipes.

        Now you really need to see The Iron Maidens!

        Like

      • I heard a Headspace album and liked it. Didn’t realize Wilson was the singer. Good to know.

        I don’t see many live shows and I’m picky about the ones I go to, so it’s unlikely I’ll see The Iron Maidens, but I will seek out some YouTube performances when I have the time.

        Like

  9. Neil
    September 16, 2016

    I happen to have just found my one and only Iron Maiden album the other night and I guess it’s Poweslave, I just got asked to turn it off by my wife who claims I am like a 15 year old kid.

    Like

    • If Powerslave is the only Maiden album in your collection you’ve got a great one there. As far as you being like a 15-year-old (which my wife tells me all the time), you should take it as a compliment…and then turn the music up while giving her the devil horns. Haha.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Daddydinorawk
    September 17, 2016

    There are 5 songs here that are excellent, the first 5. Just like Piece of Mind there is a bit of filler , but its front loaded with great songs. I dig the synth guitar sounds they came up with. Adrian Smith is a true rock hero of mine and he truly comes up with the goods here.

    Like

    • I definitely agree that this album (like Piece Of Mind) is top-loaded, but they sound so good that even the lesser songs are a joy to listen to. Martin Birch’s production might have something to do with the listenability as well. I agree about Adrian Smith’s contributions here. I assume you’re talking about his songwriting, right? I still can’t tell the guitarists apart. That will probably happen whenever I write a series on their discography.

      Like

      • Phillip Helbig
        September 20, 2016

        “I still can’t tell the guitarists apart.”

        Smith is the “master of melody”. Smoother, more melodic. At the other extreme, Gers is crunchy, rough. Murray is somewhere in between, and more bluesy.

        Presumably you can instantly recognize which Beatle is singing which song. 🙂

        Like

      • Thanks for the quick course in Maiden guitaristry (is that a word?). I will keep this in mind next time I listen to them and hopefully I’ll start distinguishing their styles. I should also watch some of my Maiden live DVDs.

        And yes, I can tell who’s singing every Beatles song. I used to have trouble telling George & John apart on the early recordings but now their voices are very distinct to me.

        Like

  11. J.
    September 17, 2016

    I’m not familiar with this one. I’ve only recently revisited Iron Maiden, as, after buying, and liking, a couple of cassettes when I was a tad younger (Powerslave and Fear Of The Dark), I decided it was no longer for me when I heard the likes of Nirvana, Soundgarden, and Pearl Jam. I dare say I’ll get to this one at some point!

    Like

    • I think those grunge-era bands did that to a lot of metalheads. I wasn’t into either at the time so the changing of the guard didn’t affect me. Never liked Pearl Jam (talented musicians but I simply can’t stand Eddie Vedder’s voice) but I came around to some of the others. I think Smashing Pumpkins are my favorite in retrospect, mostly for their prog-rock leanings and the amazing drumming of Jimmy Chamberlin.

      Liked by 1 person

      • J.
        September 20, 2016

        Eddie Vedder is something of a mumbler. Some great moments, right enough (when he really tears it up on Vs. for example). However, I much preferred Vedder to Corgan. Which is why I only deal in small doses of Smashing Pumpkins.

        Like

      • I don’t mind mumblers, it’s just that Vedder’s voice and overall persona have always rubbed me the wrong way. I can’t defend Corgan’s voice…it is an acquired taste for sure…but I happen to love it. His attitude hasn’t done him any favors with fans & critics (and other bands) but his songwriting is often amazing. Also, he doesn’t sound like anyone else.

        Like

      • J.
        September 20, 2016

        Have you seen the PJ20 film? There’s a few things in that which suggest Vedder has a questionable personality. It’s just a shame the film never explored the power struggle and how he took control.

        Some of the Pearl Jam side projects are pretty exceptional, though. Highly recommend the first Brad album, Stone Gossard’s first solo album, and Jeff Ament’s work (particularly RNDM with Joseph Arthur).

        And that’s a good point about Corgan. He’s very unique.

        Like

      • The Pearl Jam ship sailed far away from me a long time ago. I haven’t seen the PJ20 film and I’m not interested. As for side projects, I’m always open for them. I own (and like) a Tuatara album that has Mike McCready on it. I think there may be another PJ-related album in my collection but I can’t remember what it is. And then there’s Neil Young’s Mirrorball. The PJ guys are all stellar musicians so I’m sure there’s lots of great stuff in their discographies.

        Like

      • J.
        September 20, 2016

        That’s fair enough, Rich. I only saw it myself, as a PJ loving friend threw it my way a while back. It’s definitely not gonna pull you back in. I felt that it really wasn’t interesting enough to mark that 20 year milestone, really.

        As for Tuatara, there’s a whole lot of interesting vibes there. The main man, Barrett Martin, is one of my favourite drummers / percussionists. Can be found on a whole host of albums, too.

        Like

      • I just remembered the other PJ-related CD I own: the self-titled debut from Three Fish. I remember really liking it but can’t recall much about it right now.

        Like

      • J.
        September 20, 2016

        That’s a good album. One of Jeff Ament’s projects. Their second release, The Quiet Table, is pretty stellar, too. Really very good.

        Like

  12. Tangled Up In Music
    September 18, 2016

    I own The Number of the Beast, but I never really understood the hype. Maybe it’s time to listen again.

    Like

    • It depends on your enjoyment of this style of music. I think you can love Maiden without being a metalhead but they have a particular sound and they’re so great at it. I hope one day you hear a Maiden album and it really “hits” you.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Tangled Up In Music
        September 19, 2016

        I like me some metal, for sure. Black Sabbath is one of my very favorite bands, especially the Ozzy era. And recently I’ve gotten into Metallica’s 80s stuff which kind of blew me away being only familiar with the 90s hits. Maiden have a certain pomposity to them that turns me off, I think.

        Like

      • Hmm, Maiden & pomposity? I see it more as “grandeur” but I think I understand why you haven’t connected with them. I bet you would really enjoy their first two albums with Paul Di’Anno, which have that similar mix of metal with punk energy that the early Metallica albums have.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. 1537
    September 18, 2016

    Good write up, although I always liked the artwork far more than the music on this one.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Enter your email address to subscribe to KamerTunesBlog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 331 other followers

Archives

%d bloggers like this: