KamerTunesBlog

Revisiting my extensive music collection, one artist at a time

SUPERGRASS Part 1 – Thoughts On An Artist / They’re Alright

The Britpop era of the 1990’s spawned a number of popular bands like Oasis, Blur, Suede, Pulp, The Verve, Cast and Supergrass. Although each of these groups had their own distinct sound, the common denominator was their shared love of classic ‘60s British pop (The Beatles, The Kinks, The Hollies) and ‘80s indie rock (The Smiths as well as their less-lauded contemporaries). Factor in various headline-grabbing fights in the British Supergrass Photo (circa 1995)tabloids between some of these artists and “Britpop” became an era-defining term which many of them had trouble shaking off as they moved into the new millennium. While some of the aforementioned bands were able to crack the U.S. market, they were most successful in their homeland. I never regarded these bands as part of a musical movement; they were just a bunch of new (or new-to-me) artists who were recording melodic music with a modern, aggressive approach, and that’s all it took for me to become a fan. I was more passionate about some of these bands than others, but Supergrass has always been the pinnacle of that era for me…by a wide margin. I usually focus my blog series on the lesser-played artists in my collection, but I’m making a rare exception here. A few months ago I bought a copy of the Supergrass Is 10 DVD from 2004, which includes all of their promotional videos and a career-spanning documentary (up to that point), and it reminded me (a) how much I love their music and (b) that it’s been nearly a decade since I played most of their albums. I figured it was a good time to share my enthusiasm as I revisit their discography, and after spending the last week with their first two records I couldn’t be more excited.

I still recall the first time I saw their debut. It was part of a care package from a friend at their record label (one of the perks of working in the music industry). Whenever I would receive a box full of CDs, other than discs I specifically requested I would usually play a little bit of each CD to see if it was something I might like, and if it didn’t pique my interest I would either pass it along to another music-loving friend or sell/trade it. Looking at those cartoonish faces on the front cover of I Should Coco (1995), I figured this was a young punk band that would be immediately forgotten, but as Supergrass - I Should Cocoeach subsequent song played my ears continued to perk up, and by the end of the first listen I knew the album was a keeper. The trio of singer/guitarist Gaz Coombes (only 18 when I Should Coco was recorded), bassist Mick Quinn and drummer Danny Goffey, along with unofficial fourth member (and Gaz’s brother) Rob Coombes on keyboards, combined the melodicism of The Kinks & The Beatles, the ferocious rhythms of The Who, the Anglo-centric vocals of Madness and the punk/pop energy of The Buzzcocks into a musical stew that sounded like no one but themselves. For a group of young men (Quinn was the oldest at 24), they clearly devoured a lot of music in their youth, and they delivered a nearly perfect album to kick-start their career. Of the 13 tracks here, all but one are included in my lists of Essential & Notable tracks below. Only “We’re Not Supposed To” was left off. It’s a fun track, but with the speeded-up vocals & silly atmosphere, it’s not far off from David Bowie’s early novelty song, “The Laughing Gnome.” Otherwise, it’s hard to ignore the onslaught of one great song after another.

The Essentials:
♪ “I’d Like To Know” – The first of four consecutive killer tracks to start the album. Rolling drums, chugging bass, Farfisa(?) organ, sneering vocals and great “ooooh, la la la la” backing vocals. I love the bright, open chorus (“I’d like to know where all the strange ones go”) and the slow, descending middle section.
♪ “Caught By The Fuzz” – Their debut single which just missed the UK Top 40. Splashy drums, slightly distorted vocals and great dynamics (claustrophobic verses and bright choruses). This level of subtlety is not something you usually hear from such young musicians. Has a similar energy to Green Day’s earliest hits.

♪ “Mansize Rooster” – Their first Top 20 single; a fun Kinks/Madness hybrid. Stomping verses with plinking piano, and the rhythm section is on fire. Huge melodic hooks at “Why you looking so crazy, why you looking so lonely for love?” and “How would you know if you never, ever saw me?”
♪ “Alright” – Their third single and biggest hit, reaching #2 on the UK singles chart. Features barrelhouse piano, a driving rhythm, a peppy melody and upbeat, fun lyrics (“We are young, we run free, keep our teeth nice & clean, see our friends, see the sights, feel alright”). There’s a cool driving rock ‘n’ roll vibe during the instrumental section followed by a tasteful melodic guitar solo.

♪ “Lenny” – Another Top 10 single, this one starting off with heavy repetitive bass on the up-beat through the intro. Quinn delivers an impressive, fluid, John Entwistle-esque bass line, and I love the lyrical hook at “I’ve been around and around but I got nowhere to go now.”
♪ “She’s So Loose” – This one has more of an acoustic feel while retaining the propulsive rhythm of the majority of the other songs here. I love Gaz’s soaring vocals at “Take…my…love…away” and the slowed-down tempo for the three-word chorus.
♪ “Time” – Part of a double A-side single with “Alright.” There’s a tight, midtempo semi-shuffle groove and I like the way he draws out certain words, i.e. “The tiiiiime” and “I knoooow.” This is a simple song with a catchy hook at “Yeah I know what I, I see, have it all you,” and I enjoy the subtle harmonica accents.
♪ “Time To Go” – One of my all-time favorite album closers; a short (under 2 minutes), slow, bouncy, simple acoustic tune that hints at an early-‘70s Pink Floyd influence. There’s an end-of-the-party feeling when he sings, “Thanks to everyone for everything you’ve done but now it’s time to go,” and I’ve always loved his inflection at “Who could ask for more?”
[Supergrass – “Time To Go”] [audio http://k003.kiwi6.com/hotlink/o0w2hc9wzj/Time_to_Go.mp3]

Other Notable Tracks:

  • Supergrass Photo (from I Should Coco)“Lose It” – Has a great vibe but not quite as classic as the four opening tracks that precede it. Features rumbling bass and Gaz screaming “So don’t loooose it, no don’t loooose it” with some distortion added to his vocals.
  • “Strange Ones” – Lyrically similar to album opener “I’d Like To Know” (“There’s a place where the strange ones go where nobody here could know”) but musically different. It’s more psychedelic, and there’s a cool shift to a 6/8 rhythm at “I want to cry for you, I want to die for you.”
  • “Sitting Up Straight” – The soft 20-second piano intro gives no indication of the fast, punky rocker to follow. It’s short and has great energy: “Sitting up straight on the back of the bus, mimicking time as the evening turns to dusk.”
  • “Sofa (Of My Lethargy)” – The longest song here at more than 6 minutes, and it takes its time to travel through various sections. There’s a slow, loping rhythm with tasty organ accents, subtle drumming and an overall hazy, unsurprisingly lethargic vibe. It picks up at “Hold on now, all I wanna do is see you” but quickly slows back down. The early-‘70s Pink Floyd influence mentioned above first appears here, but it’s mixed with elements of The Faces and The Band, and there’s an excellent slow 2-minute Floydian outro.

They avoided the sophomore slump with In It For The Money (1997), charting just one notch lower than the top spot reached by its predecessor and featuring four Top 20 singles (three in the Top 10). At this point they were one of the biggest bands in the U.K. and even though they didn’t have Supergrass - In It For The Moneythe same impact on the other side of the Atlantic their following here continued to grow. The initial U.S. edition came with a 9-track bonus disc that included acoustic & alternate mixes of two songs from the debut along with several b-sides that most Americans wouldn’t have heard before. The hit-to-miss ratio might be slightly lower than it was on I Should Coco, but that was always going to be a tough act to follow, and most of the songs would sit comfortably on a career-spanning anthology (with at least six of them being instant classics). Musically & lyrically they’re a little more diverse & mature, and the mood is slightly darker, but it’s still a fun, youthful collection that confirmed their place among the best artists of their era, Britpop or otherwise.

The Essentials:
♪ “In It For The Money” – An eerie organ intro gives way to dark yet jangly guitar and slowly building drums. There’s a repetitive beat as they repeat the title over & over, then it opens up at “Got my mind made up, I got my finger on the button going waaaay home.” The melodies are deceptively complex, and I like the addition of horns to the mix.
♪ “Richard III” – The second single from the album which matched the #2 chart success of “Alright.” Rumbling drums & bass make way for a brighter, driving, riff-heavy groove. I love the falsetto “ooooh”s and the fantastic hooks at “I know you wanna try to get away but it’s the hardest thing you’ll ever know.” There’s a simple synth melody that sounds like a Theremin at the repeated “Tryin’ to get at you” refrain.


♪ “Late In The Day” – The final single released from the album, and another Top 20 hit. After strummed acoustic guitar and Gaz’s high vocals in the intro, the band kicks in with a slow, loping disco rhythm at around 1:00 (“All the time I thought of you in an ordinary way”). My favorite parts are the Floyd-influenced Moog synth section and Gaz’s simple, melodic, crunchy guitar solo.
♪ “Sun Hits The Sky” – The longest song at just under 5 minutes and another Top 10 single, featuring a great riff and a driving, pulsing rhythm. There are two distinct melodies: (1) “I know a place where the sun hits the sky…” and (2) “I am a doctor, I’ll be your doctor, I’m on my way…” Rob Coombes comes up with a cool squiggly synth break, and there’s a great alternating 1-2, 1-2 instrumental section.

♪ “Going Out” – Simple lyrics and an instantly catchy melody made this an excellent choice for leadoff single, and British record-buyers agreed when it reached the Top 5. It begins with a circus-like droning organ and picks up with a splashy midtempo rhythm. I like the juxtaposition of “If you want to go out…read it in the papers, tell me what it’s all about” and the slower “Oh no, oh no” section.
♪ “It’s Not Me” – Another Pink Floyd-influenced track, this semi-unplugged tune is carried along by pleasantly strummed acoustic guitar, piano, sparse percussion and flanged electric guitar. It’s simply gorgeous from start to finish, especially the chorus: “It’s not me, no no not me, but I don’t know what is.”

Other Notable Tracks:

  • Supergrass Photo (from Richard III CD single)“Tonight” – A killer staccato guitar riff in the intro is followed by a peppy, horn-infused pop/rock tune. Has all the energy of the first album but the sound is more fleshed-out.
  • “Hollow Little Reign” – Light & jazzy in 6/8 time, with a soft piano groove and flanged guitar accents. Stands apart from the other songs with its own unique atmosphere, and the last line of each stanza (“Some day…when I ca-a-a-an”) is a solid hook. I also love Gaz’s wah-wah guitar solo.

Notable Tracks On Bonus Disc:

  • “Wait For The Sun” – A b-side from the “Lenny” CD single. Pastoral with a hint of menace, and some David Gilmour-esque guitar. “I may not know everyone along the waaaay” is an excellent hook.
  • “Je Suis Votre Papa Sucre” – The English translation is “I Am Your Sugar Daddy.” This brief instrumental has a light, lounge-y feel with Burt Bacharach’s influence all over it. From the “Alright” CD single.

Supergrass Photo (circa 1997)
I already knew I loved both of these albums before revisiting them for the first time in nearly a decade last week, but somehow I’m even more of a fan now. I was pleased to discover the recurring Pink Floyd influence in so many of their songs, which I don’t think I had previously picked up on. I’m eager to spend time with the next few albums this coming week, and I look forward to sharing my (re)discoveries with you in my next post. Until then, I’d love to hear from anyone who enjoys their music, whether you’ve collected their entire catalog or only know them via their hit singles or a compilation. Thanks.

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40 comments on “SUPERGRASS Part 1 – Thoughts On An Artist / They’re Alright

  1. ianbalentine
    February 26, 2015

    I am so glad you’re giving this very under appreciated band the spotlight. More than any other band of the ’90’s (except maybe Teenage Fanclub) Supergrass were the most consistently excellent. You’re on the money as far as I Should Coco, 90% killer! And In It For The Money is just as good. Over the years I play IIFTM a bit more than ISC, but that’s just me. I love the fact you picked up on the Pink Floyd influence; Time always reminded me of a Stones song.

    I’m lucky to have the version with the 9 song EP, that version on Caught By The Fuzz is great! I heard that they will be releasing a deluxe version of Coco in a couple of months, so your timing with this series is fantastic!

    Like

    • Thanks for the feedback, Ian. There was a time when Supergrass wasn’t under-appreciated, especially in the UK, but now that Britpop is a distant memory they’ve been lumped together with all of those artists in the press and their uniqueness has been forgotten by a lot of people. There was a period, through the self-titled third album, when I described them as my favorite band of the ’90s, and this series should go a long way to reestablishing my passion for their music. As you can tell from this post, I love In It For The Money but I don’t think it’s quite as consistent as I Should Coco, even though it is slightly more diverse. They’re certainly a great 1-2 punch. I hadn’t heard about a deluxe version of I Should Coco but I will eagerly snap that up if they include all of the rare tracks from that era. Thanks for letting me know about it.

      Like

  2. ianbalentine
    February 26, 2015

    Just one more thought: any truth to the rumor that Steven Spielberg tried to recruit them for a Monkees-like television show? I seem to have heard that back when they released In It For The Money? Also, I should mention that the cover of IIFTM is a great send up of Willie and the Poor Boys. Great sense of humor.

    Like

    • I never heard that rumor about Spielberg & Supergrass. If I can find some free time I’ll look into it. I hadn’t made the connection between In It For The Money and that CCR album but I can see the similarity. Thanks for pointing it out. I really appreciate your input and enthusiasm about their music.

      Best…
      Rich

      Like

  3. 1537
    February 27, 2015

    I really enjoyed this one Rich. I own most of their singles and an earlier indie release of Caught By The Fuzz, which they rerecorded for their debut.

    I always loved Road to Rouen best of their LPs.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Mr. 1537. I wonder how different the early indie versions of some of those songs are from their album counterparts. I get the feeling they had their sound developed pretty quickly, so it’s probably just a matter of a fuller studio sound & better mastering on the album, but the songs were great right from the start.

      I’m looking forward to revisiting all their albums, but especially the last two (including Road To Rouen) because I didn’t spend as much time with them when they were released as I did with their earlier releases.

      Like

  4. mikeladano
    February 27, 2015

    Supergrass!!! I enjoyed this one too Rich, but I don’t know much about them. My buddies at the store LOVED ’em. Always encouraged me to check them out.

    Like

    • Hi Mike, I could definitely see you loving Supergrass, and their discography is pretty compact so it would be easy to collect if you do get into them. For casual fans there’s a great compilation that I’ll be including in my next post. Also, as Ian (Uncle E) mentioned in an earlier comment, their debut is supposed to get the Deluxe Edition treatment soon, so that could be the perfect entry point for Mr. Deluxe Edition himself, Mike Ladano.

      Liked by 1 person

      • mikeladano
        February 27, 2015

        Yeah, that’s me alright! I’ll keep my eyes peeled for that. Supergrass and bands of their ilk always had solid B-sides.

        Like

      • A lot of bands from the Britpop era released some incredible b-sides, often as good as or better than the a-sides and album tracks. Supergrass are an excellent example, as are Oasis & Suede. In fact, my introduction to Suede (or The London Suede) came via their 2-CD collection of b-sides and I was immediately hooked. My two favorite bands of the last three decades, Big Country and Del Amitri, released enough b-sides to fill up multiple CDs, and the majority of them are essential listening.

        Liked by 1 person

      • mikeladano
        February 28, 2015

        I miss the concept of B-sides being as crucial as the hits. My roomate in the late 90’s was a total Brit-pop guy. He didn’t collect Suede, but he did collect Oasis, Supergrass, and many more such as the Bluetones, Dodgy, Blur, A, Pulp, and so on. So I had a lot of exposure to those great singles.

        Like

      • Of course the whole b-side thing would mean nothing if the songs weren’t good, but so many of these bands released better songs as b-sides. It amazes me how prolific they were, when there are plenty of artists who can barely put together one cohesive album.

        Like

  5. ianbalentine
    February 27, 2015

    From an interview with Gaz around the time of Diamond Hoo Ha:

    “Steven Spielberg once approached you guys about starring in your own Monkees-style TV show…”

    GAZ: “That was after the first record, right when we were recording In It for the Money, and we met up and went over ideas. It was a nice compliment, but we wanted to make our record at the time. We’d totally do it now, though, if he’s got any ideas for a show about a slightly aging rock-and-roll band.”

    Like

  6. stephen1001
    February 27, 2015

    A well deserving choice for a series Rich!
    I flip back and forth weekly, today I’ll go with in it for the money as my favourite album. A dark horse for the finest album cover of the decade too
    My favourite tunes (Mary, Movin) are still to come in your next post or two, looking forward to it!

    Like

    • Thanks, Geoff. I’m glad you’re also a fan. I was just listening to the self-titled third album today in preparation for my next post. I’ve always loved both of the songs you mentioned, especially “Mary.” I’ll be digging into that album some more, along with a couple of others, next week.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Vinyl Connection
    February 27, 2015

    Let me join the chorus of those who enjoyed being reminded of how brilliant Supergrass were. I heard “Alright” on a magazine comp I think, and was instantly smitten.
    Got a few errands today. I think you’ve just selected my car CDs!

    Like

    • Hi Bruce. I’m thrilled to know that you’re also a passionate Supergrass fan, and I’m glad this post was able to inspire your errand listening today (tomorrow in your part of the world). Thanks so much for the feedback. Also, apologies for not commenting on many of your recent posts. I’ve been following them closely but for various reasons I haven’t had the time to chime in. I’m always reading & enjoying, and will join in the conversations when I can. Have a great weekend.
      Rich

      Like

      • Vinyl Connection
        February 28, 2015

        Well, I can report that those first two albums went down very well indeed. In fact, I may well embark upon some preparatory listening of the next couple of titles!

        Like

      • Fantastic, Bruce. That brought a smile to my face. More Supergrass for everyone!

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Daddydinorawk
    February 28, 2015

    Dang dude, never saw this one coming. I have never listened to Supergrass.

    Until Now. Of course I know the song Alright, but I never knew who it was by. Aside from Oasis and Blur I hadn’t been familiar with any of these bands (despite the fact that I lived in London in 1994, but that’s a tale for another day).

    Until Now. I am so impressed by these guys. I’m listening to these 2 and Rouen (well recomended 1537)and they are completely blowing me away. One note, the opening keyboard lines to I’d Like to Know are ripped straight out of the Steve Nieve bag o’tricks. Gaz was only 18 when this was recorded? No way, way beyond mature writing for his age. One thing I love is you can spot influences without them being shoved down your throat like one can with say Oasis. Can you imagine Oasis jumping around on Pogosticks in a video? Way too serious. Blur? They would have just appeared self-conscious.

    Consider me converted. Chomping at the bit to read the next installment.

    Like

    • You’re not the only one who didn’t see this coming. Supergrass ia a band that I considered one of my favorites throughout the ’90s & early ’00s, so they weren’t an obvious choice for a blog series considering I prefer to focus on the lesser-played artists in my collection. It was the DVD collection I got recently that pushed me to start this series.

      Many of the Britpop bands I mentioned became huge between ’95 & ’97, which may explain why they didn’t seep into your consciousness when you were in London in ’94.

      Good call regarding the Steve Nieve influence. I wouldn’t be surprised if Elvis Costello’s early records were a big influence on these guys, even though it’s not obvious in the songwriting. Also, great point about their influences being obvious but not in-your-face like Oasis. I happen to love Oasis (mostly because Noel’s songs are so good) but they’re not the most stylistically diverse band. Supergrass, on the other hand, seem like they can play just about anything. The next few albums, which I’ll write about next time, support that assumption.

      Thanks for the feedback. Glad you’re enjoying this series so far.

      Like

  9. J.
    February 28, 2015

    Great post. Always like to see some love for Supergrass – they appear to be largely overlooked when folks talk about the whole ‘Brit-pop’ thing. One of the very best and most consistent of the bands that done the rounds (in my opinion).

    Like

    • Thanks, J. I’m happy to hear that you’re also a Supergrass fan. They were certainly poised for international megastardom in the ’90s, but they never scored that elusive hit single beyond the UK. Of course none of that matter to us, since we know & love their music.

      Cheers.
      Rich

      Like

      • J.
        February 28, 2015

        Indeed. Inspired some Supergrass listening, too. Road to Rouen and In It For The Money – such great albums. Always found it strange that they never quite struck gold … so many outstanding and well crafted songs.

        Like

      • I love how a simple blog post can inspire others to revisit particular artists & albums. You guys do that to me all the time so I’m happy to return the favor with Supergrass.

        Hope you’re having a great weekend.

        Liked by 1 person

  10. Every Record Tells A Story
    February 28, 2015

    I was a big Supergrass fan and saw them a few times, including at Wembley Arena and The Royal Albert Hall. I remember the talk about TV shows which stemmed from the Alright video, but they were always too sensible to go for that one. I thought there was always something interesting in each of their albums, even when things tailed off career-wise for them. Catchy tunes and melodies and some good guitar. Gaz Coombes has a new solo album out and it is superb, like part Thom Yorke solo album, only with actual tunes.

    Like

    • I’m guessing those Supergrass shows you attended were during the peak of their popularity, considering the size of those venues. The one time I saw them was at a relatively small venue in New York that probably holds 1,000 people or less. I have both of Gaz’s solo albums and they’re excellent. I’ve played the new one twice and the “Thom Yorke with tunes” comparison is accurate. I’m glad he’s still making new music but I haven’t been as passionate about his solo work as I was about Supergrass, at least so far. I believe he played most/all the instruments on the album, which is noble but also lacks the spark of playing with other people. I hope he finds some great collaborators for future solo albums.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Martyn
    March 2, 2015

    Both of the mentioned albums are top drawer. Gaz Coombes is currently touting his new solo album on the many weekend chat shows in England. Well worth a listen.

    Like

    • Thanks for stopping by, Martyn. Glad you agree about the merits of these first two Supergrass albums. I have both of Gaz’s solo albums. I was listening to the latest one for the third time on my way to work this morning and it’s excellent. I still miss the chemistry that the Supergrass guys had and I hope they eventually regroup and remind the world how great they were. I’m happy to hear that he’s out promoting the new album in the UK. Any idea what kind of reception he’s getting? Is it a big seller?

      Cheers.
      Rich

      Like

      • Martyn
        March 2, 2015

        I just checked and the second solo has done much better in the charts than his debut solo. The first album scraped into the charts at NO:54. His follow up made the top 20 at NO:18. Both were really well received by critics, myself and my friends. I’m glad because he’s always good for a laugh and his T.V appearances are always funny, and your right the original chemistry was electric!

        Like

      • I’m glad the new album is doing so well in the UK. I’m not sure it’ll even be released here in the US, and if it does it will likely sell to his existing fans. It’s kinda like the singer from one of my favorite bands, Del Amitri. Justin Currie has released three fantastic solo albums but he’s gotten no mainstream exposure here. The only people who know those records were already Del Amitri fans.

        I’ll have to seek out footage of Gaz on UK TV when I have some free time. Thanks for pointing that out to me.

        Like

  12. Pingback: GRASSED UP | VINYL CONNECTION

  13. Brian
    March 6, 2015

    Love Supergrass! Only second after Blur for me re: the Brit-poppers. Like you I didn’t really think of these bands as type of a movement either. I can to most of them a few years after their peaks (except for Oasis and strangely Suede which I got into earlier). Supergrass’s first two albums are their best. I may even go with “In It For The Money” as their peak but it’s probably too close to call. I really enjoy the band’s later stuff as well. Great players, great songwriters, great energy. And great write-up Rich!

    Like

    • Hi Brian. Thanks for the feedback. I’m a little surprised that Blur resonated more with you than Supergrass, since I feel like Supergrass had more immediately catchy singles and more consistently diverse album tracks. I like both bands but I’ve always enjoyed Supergrass significantly more. Oasis peaked early and then had a spotty career, while Suede did their best work on the first two albums (and all the related singles) when Bernard Butler was in the band. I still think I Should Coco is the strongest Supergrass album from start to finish, but the next two are pretty damn close.

      Like

  14. Brian
    March 6, 2015

    “Alright” also plays awesomely in a really good scene in the movie “Clueless” when the band was completely “nobody” in America.

    Like

    • Brian, there was so much good music in Clueless. I don’t specifically remember the scene with “Alright” but I’ll keep my eyes & ears open the next time it’s on. Since I got into Supergrass as soon as the debut album was released, and I read all the glowing reviews in British music magazines, I assumed they had a big following here as well. It wasn’t until years later that I realized how much of a cult band they’ve always been in the US.

      Like

  15. Pingback: GREAT OUT OF THE GATE – My Favorite Debut Albums Part 1 | KamerTunesBlog

  16. barrydbband
    April 20, 2015

    Hi Rich,

    Really enjoyed your review of ‘I Should Coco’ and currently I’m in the final stages of putting together the 20th Anniversary re-issue. Would love to contact you. If you’re on Facebook or Twitter you can direct message me.

    Best regards,

    Mick Quinn
    Supergrass

    https://www.facebook.com/mick.quinn.01
    https://twitter.com/MonkeyBasket

    Like

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