KamerTunesBlog

Revisiting my extensive music collection, one artist at a time

ONE AND DONE – My Favorite One-Album Artists Part 5

This might be the quirkiest batch of one-and-done albums so far, but I enjoyed revisiting them as much as anything I’ve covered in this series so far. There was no plan in place when I chose these records. I simply looked at my master list and picked the titles that made me think, “Oh yeah, that’s a good one. I should listen to it again.” Please let me know which of these you’re familiar with (and hopefully enjoy), and maybe you’ll discover a future favorite as well.

Artist: MUDCRUTCH
Album Title/Year Of Release: MUDCRUTCH (2008)
Mudcrutch
In the first half of the 1970’s, before there was Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers, Petty and future Heartbreakers Mike Campbell & Benmont Tench were members of Gainesville, Florida band Mudcrutch along with drummer Randall Marsh and guitarist Tom Leadon, brother of one-time Eagles guitarist Bernie Leadon. Other than a couple of independent singles and one recording showing up on a Tom Petty box set, Mudcrutch was merely a musical footnote until Petty reunited the group in 2007 and they released this self-titled album the following year. On the surface it could easily be mistaken for a TP & The Heartbreakers record, and I would likely include this album whenever I revisit Petty’s discography, but there are folk & country influences throughout the record which aren’t always apparent in his work. It’s also nice to hear Leadon sing lead on a couple of tracks, and even Tench takes a turn behind the microphone on one song. Anyone who enjoys Tom Petty’s music beyond the hit singles would find plenty to love here, including personal favorites “Bootleg Flyer,” all 9+ minutes of “Crystal River” and album opener “Shady Grove.” They released a live EP later that same year but this remains their only studio album, hence its worthy inclusion in this series. My only complaint is the hideous cover art, although I’ve slowly softened to its ugly charms.

Artist: JACKSON C. FRANK
Album Title/Year Of Release: JACKSON C. FRANK aka BLUES RUN THE GAME (1965)
Jackson C. Frank (Blues Run The Game)Several years ago I read the interesting story of Jackson C. Frank, whose young life was defined by a furnace explosion at his school when he was 11 years old, resulting in the death of many of his classmates and burns over 50% of his body. During his recovery he learned to play the guitar and when he was 21 he received a large insurance check & immediately flew to England. It was there that he met Paul Simon, who was on his own British sojourn at the time, and the pair struck up a musical friendship that resulted in Frank’s only album, which was produced by Simon. The rest of his life story is a sad one that ended in his 1999 death, but I want to focus on the wonderful music he recorded five decades ago. There are elements of Simon & Garfunkel and, of course, Bob Dylan (who wasn’t being influenced by him back then?), but his voice reminds me more of Phil Ochs and his guitar work is in a similar vein to British guitar whizzes Bert Jansch, John Renbourn and Davy Graham. Everything here was written by Frank, and it’s a case of one gem after another, notably “Yellow Walls,” “Milk And Honey,” “My Name Is Carnival” and the song that became his calling card, the much-covered “Blues Run The Game.” His backstory might have piqued my interest but the music is what made me a fan.

Artist: OYSTERHEAD
Album Title/Year Of Release: THE GRAND PECKING ORDER (2001)
Oysterhead - The Grand Pecking OrderOne of my biggest drumming heroes, The Police’s Stewart Copeland, makes his second appearance in this series (following his album as Klark Kent included in Part 2) with this trio that also included Phish’s Trey Anastasio and Primus’ Les Claypool. If ever a supergroup matched the sum of its parts it was Oysterhead, which blends the free-ranging jam-band vibe of Phish with the quirky, angular approach of Primus, all held together by the brilliant reggae-inflected percussion flourishes of Copeland’s best work. Some tracks lean in one particular direction, but most of my favorite songs somehow combine the seemingly disparate sounds of these distinct songwriters into something more cohesive than it would be in less capable hands. Highlights for me are “Oz Is Ever Floating,” “Army’s On Ecstasy,” “Birthday Boys” (all subtle percussion & nice acoustic picking) and “Rubberneck Lions.”

 

Artist: IMPERIAL DRAG
Album Title/Year Of Release: IMPERIAL DRAG (1996)
Imperial Drag
I previously mentioned short-lived early-‘90s power-pop icons Jellyfish in my discussion of The Grays in Part 1 of this series, since that group featured one-time Jellyfish guitarist Jason Falkner. Jellyfish, however, was the brainchild of two musicians, drummer/vocalist Andy Sturmer and keyboardist Roger Joseph Manning Jr. While Sturmer has kept a very low profile since the demise of Jellyfish, Manning has stayed more active with a handful of solo albums, a couple of collaborations with Falkner, touring work with Beck and Air, and this one-off album. Imperial Drag was essentially the work of Manning and singer/guitarist Eric Dover, who was previously the touring guitarist for Jellyfish as well as lead vocalist for Slash’s Snakepit. Although this record sounds nothing like Jellyfish, it does continue that band’s knack for memorable melodies & clever arrangements. Imperial Drag, though, has a much harder edge, with glam and pop-punk (a la Redd Kross) more on display than Beatles or Queen influences. Until last week I hadn’t played this album in many years, and I was pleased to discover how fresh it still sounds. Highlights include the stomping “‘Breakfast’ By Tiger (Kiss It All Goodbye),” the acoustic & bluesy “Dandelion” and the super-funky “Playboy After Dark.”

 

Artist: NEW RADICALS
Album Title/Year Of Release: MAYBE YOU’VE BEEN BRAINWASHED TOO (1998)
New Radicals - Maybe You've Been Brainwashed Too
I still vividly recall the time I was browsing the record bins of an HMV store and heard New Radicals’ “You Get What You Give” for the first time. I don’t think I bought the album that day but I immediately knew I had to hear more from them. It turned out that I already owned the 1989 debut solo LP by the guiding force behind the band, Gregg Alexander, a record I remember enjoying but couldn’t recall much about it. New Radicals was something far different and much more instantly accessible, the huge production and sing-along choruses making them sound like the American equivalent to British band World Party. They may be a one-hit wonder but that doesn’t make this album any less impressive than other more well-known releases from that era, its mixture of power-pop, ‘70s rock ‘n soul (they’re often compared to Todd Rundgren) and alternative resulting in a unique sound that’s held up extremely well. Alexander had big themes on his mind, and apparently his disillusionment with stardom is the reason he’s remained such an enigmatic figure in the intervening years, mostly working behind the scenes with other artists. Fortunately he left behind this fantastic album with classics like the aforementioned “You Get What You Give,” “Someday We’ll Know” (later covered by Hall & Oates), “In Need Of A Miracle” and the soulful, slow-building “I Hope I Didn’t Just Give Away The Ending.”

Artist: ON THE AIR
Album Title/Year Of Release: READY FOR ACTION AGAIN (Recorded 1980, CD Released 2002)
On The Air - Ready For Action Again
I’m not sure if I’ve previously mentioned this here at KamerTunesBlog but Scottish/English group Big Country is my favorite artist of the last 30+ years. In fact, I rank them up there with the artists I discovered in my formative years (Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, Yes, The Who, The Beatles, etc.) as one of my most important musical influences. Their songs were consistently incredible thanks to the talents of late singer/guitarist Stuart Adamson, but their rhythm section of drummer Mark Brzezicki and bassist Tony Butler was just as important in making their music have such a huge impact on me. Both Brzezicki & Butler had done numerous sessions prior to joining Big Country, most notably on Pete Townshend’s early-‘80s solo albums, but they were also members of the trio On The Air with Pete’s brother Simon Townshend. I had heard about this group during the ‘80s but it wasn’t until seeing a revamped lineup at a club in New York in 1990, with Townshend, Brzezicki (during a brief period when he left Big Country) and a different bass player, that I heard any of their music. It would be another 12 years until I finally heard the recordings made by the trio in 1980 when they were finally reissued on CD. Fans of The Jam would find a lot to like here, as Townshend’s voice bears a striking resemblance to their singer, Paul Weller, and I hear a lot of Graham Parker influence as well, especially in the song “Typically English.” Townshend’s falsetto reminds me of his older brother on “Comeback,” and “Going For Your Guns” & “Another Planet” are also perfect entry points into this overlooked band.

Artist: KEATS
Album Title/Year Of Release: KEATS (1984)
Keats
Until it was reissued on CD in 1996 I had no idea this existed, but I quickly made up for lost time. Keats was a one-time collaboration between three members of The Alan Parsons Project (two of whom had been in the ‘70s band Pilot…remember the song “Magic”?), keyboardist Pete Bardens (formerly of progressive rock band Camel) and one of the all-time great vocalists, Colin Blunstone of The Zombies (who had already contributed his vocal talents to several Alan Parsons Project records). The album was immaculately produced by Parsons, and only the prevailing technology of the time date-stamps it. At times it comes across as a lighter, less-progressive version of Asia’s first couple of albums, with a slick, airy sound that might scare off traditional prog fans or anyone with an aversion to mid-‘80s pop. It’s far from a perfect record but I’ve enjoyed it since the first time I played it. Hearing Blunstone’s voice in this setting is a special treat and I wish they had worked together again. Some of my favorite tracks are “Tragedy,” “Fight To Win” and “Turn Your Heart Around,” all of which deserved mainstream radio play.

Artist: BETH GIBBONS & RUSTIN MAN
Album Title/Year Of Release: OUT OF SEASON (2002)
Beth Gibbons and Rustin Man - Out Of Season
I wasn’t always a fan of British trip-hop group Portishead. When they burst onto the scene with their multi-million-selling debut in 1994 I had no interest in that style of music, but a few years later I was won over by their slinky rhythms, jazzy melodies and the fragile, heartbreaking vocals of frontwoman Beth Gibbons. I can’t say I’ve ever become a massive fan of their music but I like them enough to own (and enjoy) all of their albums, and to be interested in this collaboration she did with Talk Talk bassist Paul Webb (as the mysteriously-named Rustin Man). Out Of Season received a lot of positive press in several UK music magazines, which cited the more organic musical surroundings (versus the programmed sounds of Portishead) as a unique setting for Gibbons’ vocals. She’s always in complete command even though it often sounds like her voice is on the verge of cracking with emotion. I love the combination of jazz & folk elements throughout the record, accompanied by strings & other orchestral instruments. Key tracks for me are “Romance,” where you hear an obvious Billie Holiday influence along with hints of Burt Bacharach in the music, the muted intensity of “Sand River,” the melancholy “Drake” with its sweet harmonica refrain and “Tom The Model,” which simply sounds like no one else but Beth Gibbons & Rustin Man.

Artist: THE THORNS
Album Title/Year Of Release: THE THORNS (2003)
The Thorns
Brendan O’Brien has been one of the most successful producers of the last couple of decades, putting his huge sonic stamp on albums by Pearl Jam, Stone Temple Pilots, AC/DC, Bruce Springsteen and many others. At times I’ve described his work as “over-production” since nearly every record has the same massive sound, even when it doesn’t necessarily suit a particular artist (Michael Penn, for example). Occasionally, though, he can pull back the reins and allow the music & vocals to do all the work, and this album is a perfect example. The Thorns consisted of three well-respected songwriters: Matthew Sweet (I own all of his albums), Pete Droge (I own his first three albums) and Shawn Mullins (I’m only familiar with his 1998 hit single “Lullaby”). Their self-titled album is a throwback to the ‘70s Laurel Canyon singer-songwriter sound, with obvious nods to Crosby, Stills & Nash and The Eagles, and studio pros like Jim Keltner, Greg Leisz and Roy Bittan are on board to flesh out the sound of the three frontmen. Other than one cover (the exquisite “Blue” by The Jayhawks) and one Matthew Sweet song, all three are credited as co-writers on the remaining tracks. It’s mostly slick, mellow, acoustic, jangly, folky soft-rock with smooth harmonies, and there are plenty of highlights: the modern-day CSN of “Think It Over,” the quirky Tom Petty-ish rock of “Dragonfly,” the beautifully melodic “I Told You” and the should-have-been hit single “I Can’t Remember.” All three of them are still active so I continue to hold out hope that another Thorns album will appear someday.

Artist: CALEB
Album Title/Year Of Release: FEAR OF SUCCESS (2000)
Caleb - Fear Of Success
If I remember correctly, it was my friend Rick who suggested I check out this album by the apparently surname-free Caleb at the turn of the millennium, which was around the same time we were learning about similar melodic rock singer/songwriters like David Mead, Gus Black and John Mayer, only one of whom would achieve mass commercial success even though they all deserved mainstream recognition. Until recently I didn’t know much about Caleb beyond this one superb album, but apparently his full name is Caleb Heineman and he’s a New York City-based musician who must have had some friends in high places when he signed his deal with Universal Music. The album was produced by Kevin Killen, who has worked with U2, Peter Gabriel, Bryan Ferry, Elvis Costello and dozens more, and it features the talents of studio legends like bassist Tony Levin and drummer Shawn Pelton. Of course, none of this background information would matter if the songs weren’t good, but fortunately he wrote a slew of great ones like “Pick Yourself” (funky with a Police/reggae vibe), “These Four Walls” (moody, sparse pop), “Throw Down Your Weapons” (another Police-inspired light-reggae tune that reminds me even more of Colorado-based band The Samples) and “Welcome” (the opening track that’s a perfect gateway into his music). With credits including guitar, bass, piano, synth, percussion loops, electric sitar and programming he’s clearly a talented musician, and it’s a shame that this is the only record he’s made. Apparently he’s recorded a handful of digital-only songs in recent years but Fear Of Success remains his only official release.

 

Although I have dozens more one-album artists I’d like to revisit & share with you, I will be putting this series to rest for a while. Next time I need a break after completing a series on a particular artist’s discography I will continue the one-and-done theme with Part 6. I originally expected this to be a nice little diversion but it’s been so much more fun than I had expected. I hope you’ve enjoyed it as much as I have.

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52 comments on “ONE AND DONE – My Favorite One-Album Artists Part 5

  1. danicapiche
    December 7, 2014

    Part 5 🙂 Tom Petty is one of my all-time favorites, so it’s surprising I haven’t listened to Mudcrutch before. Thanks for including this one…I’m looking forward to the others…yes, I’m still on Shady Grove….Thanks, Rich 🙂

    Like

    • Hi Danica. I’m glad I continue to feature things that you like after 5 posts in this series. I have a feeling the Mudcrutch album slipped under the radar of a lot of Petty fans which is a shame…it’s as good as anything he’s done in the last couple of decades. Keep enjoying “Shady Grove.”

      Best…
      Rich

      Liked by 1 person

      • danicapiche
        December 7, 2014

        Absolutely. Your blog is a treasure trove, Rich. Thanks again for sharing with us 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • As always, I really appreciate the kind words, Danica. Hope you’re having a great weekend.

        Liked by 1 person

      • danicapiche
        December 7, 2014

        Thanks and likewise, Rich. I hope you have some free time after creating this post!

        Like

      • Hoping for some free time this week, although between work, shopping for gifts and working on my next blog post my schedule will be pretty active. I will, however, relax for the remainder of the weekend, no matter how little time is left.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. 1537
    December 7, 2014

    I’ve enjoyed these Rich, but the only one I really know is the Mudcrutch one, which I absolutely love.

    Like

    • There’s some good stuff in this post if you have a chance to check out the clips. If not, I’m still happy to know that you’re a fan of the Mudcrutch album (it’s one of Petty’s best), and thanks for checking out these posts.

      Rich

      Liked by 1 person

      • 1537
        December 7, 2014

        Theres always room for new (to me) bands over here.

        Like

      • I love discovering new and new-to-me music by whatever means I get exposed to it. I’m glad my blog can be part of that for you.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Gary
    December 7, 2014

    I should like The Thorns but just never got into it. Will give it another try based on your recommendation Rich.

    Like

    • Gary, I know you’re a Matthew Sweet fan but if you don’t like the Laurel Canyon soft-rock sound then you probably won’t get into The Thorns. Let me know if you grow to like it at some point.

      Like

  4. deKE
    December 7, 2014

    Rich,that New Radicals album was played big time here in Canada and than well they faded away. I always thought that the lead singer had a interesting voice.

    Like

    • Didn’t realize the New Radicals album was big in Canada. I remember the first single getting a lot of airplay here in the U.S. but I’m not sure if the album was a big success. In fact, I don’t think it even cracked the Top 40.

      Like

  5. deKE
    December 8, 2014

    Well I know they played the single tons here….don’t know about album sales though…..

    Like

    • I’m surprised the album wasn’t a bigger hit even with just one hit single, since it was back in the days when people still bought full albums based on one song.

      Like

  6. "Vinyl Connection"
    December 8, 2014

    Well, after that rap for Big Country, I’ll have to give them a try again!
    Hated Keats (sold off the vinyl years ago), loved The Thorns (being a Matthew Sweet fan) and saw them support the Dixie Chicks in Melbourne. Don’t know any of the others! But a fun read. Thanks Rich.

    Like

    • Bruce, are you not a Big Country fan or have you just not checked out much of their music? I’ve loved them since the first time I heard them in 1983. It’s amazing how quickly they became such an important band to me.

      Not surprised about your dislike for Keats. They’re definitely not for everyone but I have an affinity for prog-pop (if that’s really a sub-genre) and I love Blunstone’s voice. Glad we agree about The Thorns. Excellent record. Hope they’ll release another one someday.

      Like

  7. J.
    December 8, 2014

    Like tge previous posts, there are some in there I’ve never heard. However, I’m a fan of Jackson C. Frank (introduced to that stuff via the Soulsavers’ version of Blues Run The Game with Mark Lanegan). Most importantly, though … Imperial Drag! Yeah!

    Like

  8. mikeladano
    December 8, 2014

    A lot of music here that I have never heard before, but some that I have (Imperial Drag, New Radicals). Of this installment, I think Mudcrutch is really special and interesting. I thought they could have done a lot better with the cover art though. To me it looks like a second rate grunge band’s cover!

    Like

    • Good observation about that Mudcrutch cover. I remember being appalled the first time I saw it, and I wouldn’t be surprised if that alone was a main reason for people avoiding the album. I bet the record would have found a much larger audience had they billed it as Tom Petty & Mudcrutch. How many TP fans don’t even know this album exists?

      Imperial Drag seems like something you would really enjoy. Since you own the CD I assume you’re a fan, right?

      Like

      • Daddydinorawk
        December 10, 2014

        Seems to me that if you are a big enough Petty fan the name Mudcrutch would not be alien to you. But what do i know.

        Never heard of Jackson Frank but damn what a tragic story.

        Like

      • I’m sure Petty fanatics were all aware of the Mudcrutch album, but more casual Petty fans…the ones who might check out a new TP & The Heartbreakers record if a song is played on the radio…would never know about it.

        Like

  9. ianbalentine
    December 8, 2014

    Wow, you’ve got me on most of these. Other than 3 I am totally unfamiliar! VERY excited to check out the Oysterhead and Imperial Drag! The APP one sounds like something I might be interested in as well. Actually, it sounds like all of ‘me might rate a spin. Damn you, Kamerman! I promised the wife and kids I’d spend some time with them this Christmas season…oh well, they’ll understand.

    Like

    • Apologies to the Balentine clan for this post, but I’m pleased that you found some things that piqued your interest. Since you’ve done that to me as well (Robyn Hitchcock, Jazz Butcher, etc) we’ll call it even. Please let me know your thoughts on anything you get your hands on. Thanks.

      Like

  10. ianbalentine
    December 8, 2014

    Hey Rich, by the way, I’ve been listening to the deluxe edition of Steeltown, and I am just loving it. Always had a soft spot for them, but I can see this turning into something more. Thanks again for the push.

    Like

    • I am thrilled to hear that Steeltown is having an impact on you, Ian. As you know, it’s my favorite album of the ’80s and I consider it one of the most powerful albums ever recorded. The rest of their catalog, and certainly everything after The Seer, has a different sound which alienated some fans, but if you listen to them in sequence you’ll hear a clear progression…and some incredible songs.

      Like

  11. danicapiche
    December 9, 2014

    Hi Rich, I’ve made it to Jackson C. Frank and I have to say — thank you! His music is beautiful. I can’t decide whether I like his voice or guitar work the most. What a backstory, thanks for including it. It’s interesting that Paul Simon produced his album and a shame there’s only one. For some reason this song made me think of Eva Cassidy’s music though I’m not sure why….

    Like

    • Danica, I’m so glad you’re enjoying Jackson C. Frank. I feel exactly the same about his vocals & guitar work. He was a subtly sophisticated player and his vocals are so emotive, more so than many of his contemporaries. Have you played any of his other songs besides the one I embedded in this post? I have a particular affection for “My Name is Carnival.” Great comparison with Eva Cassidy which I hadn’t thought of. Ironically, they both have interesting (and heartbreaking) back stories that often bring people to their music.

      Liked by 1 person

      • danicapiche
        December 9, 2014

        Rich, that’s it exactly: subtle, sophisticated and emotive. Your post is the first I’d heard of him and “Blues Run The Game” is my first listen. I’ll find “My Name is Carnival”, thanks for the suggestion. Is it the heartbreaking backstories that make the music so perfectly bittersweet?

        Liked by 1 person

      • I would like to think that we would love their music without the heartbreaking backstories, but who knows if we would even have heard of these artists without them. It’s impossible to separate the two at this point.

        Liked by 1 person

  12. Daddydinorawk
    December 10, 2014

    One of my favorite ever concert going adventures was driving from Oakland to LA with a chum to catch Oysterhead at the Hollywood Palladium. Of course I had a few recent tours following Phish around and first saw Les with Primus way way way back in like 1989 at some now sadly defunct Bay Area venues. Of course the Police and I go way back, back to about 1980, so the fact that these three giants got together even to record one album was like…like nothing I can even explain. We get down there and stake out a really nice space about 20 feet back, center stage. and thats not even as close as I ever got to Claypool. Pretty good show, the thing I remember the most was the trip down and back, driving with a pal and meeting some weird artist types down in some East LA Warehouse. Great experience. We listened to my entire Tom Waits collection on the drive down.

    I found out years later that the Hollywood Palladium was the venue the Blues Brothers played at the end of the film, the so called Palace Hotel Ballroom.

    Like

    • That is an awesome story about your Oysterhead experience. Sometimes a show is more memorable when everything else about it…the people you’re with, the travel to/from the show, the weather, etc…is actually better than the performance itself. The fact that the venue was the same one from The Blues Brothers movie makes it one of the great concert stories I’ve ever heard. Thanks for sharing.

      Like

  13. Lewis Johnston
    December 11, 2014

    This has all been very interesting, throughout this series of posts I was pretty surprised at how many of these artists and albums I knew about. I really have enjoyed the Toy Matinee album though, that has been a worthwhile addition to my collection and there are a few others that you have written about on here I will be looking into. Always nice to find something that I have never heard of. Thanks again Rich for another good and educational read.

    Like

    • I really appreciate the positive feedback, Lewis, and I’m especially pleased that you’ve been enjoying the Toy Matinee album. That’s been a special record to me for nearly 25 years and I’m always thrilled to find others who like it as much as I do.

      Sometime in the next few days I’ll be following up this series with a related post that I’m hoping you’ll appreciate. Then it’ll be time to work on my year-in-review. Can’t wait for that, since 2014 has been another year of great discoveries old & new.

      Cheers!
      Rich

      Like

  14. Lewis Johnston
    December 11, 2014

    I will be definitely getting The Thorns album, that does sound like something I would definitely enjoy listening to. I am looking forward to the next post in this series very much.

    Cheers!

    Lewis

    Like

    • Thanks, Lewis. I’m putting this series on hold for now but I’ve got a fun post in the works that is somewhat related. Stay tuned.

      I hope The Thorns album lives up to your expectations.

      Like

  15. danicapiche
    December 15, 2014

    Rich, “Playboy After Dark” — a new favorite! This is my first exposure to Imperial Drag and I have to say: awesome :). This album is added to my wish list. Based on this one song I’m sure I’ll enjoy the whole album. Thanks so much.

    Like

    • Hi Danica. I’m thrilled that this one Imperial Drag song has inspired you to check out the whole album. I don’t think you’ll be disappointed. I had forgotten how good it is until I revisited it prior to writing this post. Be on the lookout for a related post to this series later today. It’s a fun way to cap off these discussions about one-and-done artists. I hope you had a great weekend. (Also note that your spelling errors have been corrected so no one will know about them…unless they read this parenthetical statement, of course).

      Best wishes,
      Rich

      Liked by 1 person

      • danicapiche
        December 15, 2014

        Imperial Drag! The more I hear the more I love! I found a live performance of “Boy or a Girl” — another immediate favorite! I can’t believe I didn’t know this album existed before your post. What are the band members doing now? Whatever it is, it can’t be better than Imperial Drag. They need to release another album. Or tour. Something.
        Haha spelling mistakes! Thanks for fixing them. More than anything, I don’t want to mess up your beautiful blog, Rich 🙂

        Like

      • I need to check out some live Imperial Drag performances when I have some free time. I’m not sure what Eric Dover has been up to since they split up but Roger Joseph Manning Jr. has released two excellent power-pop solo albums, a couple of collaborations with Jason Falkner and Redd Kross’ Brian Reitzell (“Logan’s Sanctuary” and “TV Eyes”) and he’s toured with Beck. Hope I didn’t lead you down another musical wormhole.

        You could never mess up my blog. Thanks for bringing your enthusiasm & positivity, which is always greatly appreciated.

        Liked by 1 person

      • danicapiche
        December 15, 2014

        Well, I guess that’s pretty good 🙂 I’ll have to enjoy Imperial Drag’s only album then. Was it something they all did for fun with their free time between other projects? I’m a little sad but ’tis better to have loved and lost….

        And, thanks 🙂

        Like

      • I don’t know the story behind their formation (or dissolution) but I jumped on this album since I was a huge fan of Jellyfish and needed to hear anything Manning did after they split.

        Liked by 1 person

      • danicapiche
        December 15, 2014

        “Be on the lookout for a related post to this series later today” — can’t wait! Thanks so much, Rich.

        Like

      • It should be posted within the hour. It’s among my favorites of all the posts I’ve written. Hope you like it.

        Liked by 1 person

      • danicapiche
        December 15, 2014

        Standing by.

        Like

  16. Tom Emanuel
    January 6, 2015

    Some great choices here! Longtime Jellyfish/Roger Joseph Manning fan, I’ve known about Imperial Drag for a while but have never sought them out. I’ll have to change that. I’ll also have to go after that Keats record – I am a giant Alan Parsons Project fan, and an even bigger Camel fan (The Snow Goose ranks alongside albums like Pet Sounds, Abbey Road, and Born to Run in my “Perfect Records” list). Keep up the good work!

    Like

    • Thanks for the feedback, Tom. It’s always a pleasure chatting with another Jellyfish fan. You’re in for a treat with that Imperial Drag album. Your enjoyment of the Keats album will depend on your tolerance for mid-’80s AOR productions. I’m with you regarding Camel and “The Snow Goose.” We must have a lot of crossover in our collections.

      Cheers!
      Rich

      Like

  17. Pingback: You Get What You Give (Live) | Living a Beautiful Life

  18. Pingback: Boy or a Girl? (Live) | Living a Beautiful Life

  19. Pingback: YOU RIP, YOU SHRED – My Favorite Drummers Part 2 | KamerTunesBlog

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