KamerTunesBlog

Revisiting my extensive music collection, one artist at a time

ONE AND DONE – My Favorite One-Album Artists Part 1

Recently I played a few CDs by artists who only released one album before disbanding, and it started me thinking about how many such records I own. Fortunately I’ve catalogued my music collection on a spreadsheet, so I sorted through that list and narrowed it down to include side-projects, solo albums, supergroups and any artist with only one album in their discography. Although some of them are well-known & even legendary, I realized that many have probably been forgotten by anyone who wasn’t around at the time of release. I’m very familiar with about half of the 130+ titles on the master list, and I’ll have to revisit the others to see how they stack up. Instead of merely posting the complete list, I’ve decided to highlight my favorites in a short series of posts, where I can write a brief description for each & include some audio clips for your listening pleasure. I’m sure there are plenty of one-album artists that others like more than I do, so this is not designed to be a best-of list but rather a documentation of the ones that had the greatest impact on me. Hopefully you’ll find some surprises in these posts, and maybe even discover a new favorite. For Part 1, I’ve chosen ten albums that I know extremely well, listed in no particular order as they’re all classics in my eyes.

Artist: ROCKPILE
Album Title/Year Of Release: SECONDS OF PLEASURE (1980)
Rockpile - Seconds Of PleasureAny group combining the rock & roll classicism of Dave Edmunds with the pub rock/new wave sensibilities of Nick Lowe had to be great, and the only album released under this band name lived up to expectations. Along with Billy Bremner and Terry Williams, this four-piece previously performed together on several Edmunds & Lowe solo albums (much like Faces had provided the music for some early Rod Stewart records), and they were the backing band for a number of songs on an album by Carlene Carter (Nick Lowe’s then-wife and Johnny Cash’s stepdaughter) the same year as Seconds Of Pleasure. Every song here is a winner, from covers like Joe Tex’s “If Sugar Was As Sweet As You Honey” and Chuck Berry’s “Oh What A Thrill” to originals like “When I Write The Book” and “Play That Fast Thing One More Time.” The bonus EP of Everly Brothers songs was an added treat that made this great record even more enjoyable.

 

Artist: THE LA’S
Album Title/Year Of Release: the LA’S (1990)
The La'sI still remember hearing the now-classic “There She Goes” for the first time when the video aired on MTV in 1990 and being immediately enthralled. Without knowing anything else about them, I bought their self-titled album within a week and discovered a collection of proto-Britpop gems that preceded bands like Oasis, Blur and Suede. Not that The La’s sounded anything like those bands, but they did share a distinctly British sound that might have made them more successful beyond that one single had their timing been different. By the time this album was released Lee Mavers was the sole creative force, writing and meticulously recording & re-recording these songs in an attempt to capture a particular sound in his head. Based on everything I’ve read over the years, he was unhappy with the final product (produced by Steve Lillywhite), but his disappointment resulted in a much-loved album that’s a genuine all-time classic. The combination of melodic pop with skiffle and an almost sea-shanty feel to many of the songs helped it stand out from anything before or since. “There She Goes” is one of the best pure pop songs I’ve ever heard, but “Timeless Melody,” “Feeling,” “Doledrum” and just about everything else here are on the same level of greatness.

 

Artist: BLIND FAITH
Album Title/Year Of Release: BLIND FAITH (1969)
Blind FaithWhat do you get when you combine former Cream bandmates Eric Clapton & Ginger Baker with Steve Winwood between stints in Traffic and the underrated Ric Grech (formerly of Family, Traffic and many recording sessions) on bass & violin? A reluctant supergroup weighed down by unrealistic expectations which still managed to release a near-masterpiece before imploding. Clapton is in fine form, stretching the boundaries of his guitar playing beyond the blues & psychedelia of his previous work, while Winwood’s soulful vocals & tasteful keyboard work is the focal point throughout most of the album. It’s an amalgam of everything that came before it from these four stellar musicians, and pointed the way forward for some of Winwood’s more exploratory contributions to Traffic when he rejoined the following year. There are many highlights, with “Can’t Find My Way Home” and “Sea Of Joy” being the two most accessible.

 

Artist: ANDERSON BRUFORD WAKEMAN HOWE
Album Title/Year Of Release: ANDERSON BRUFORD WAKEMAN HOWE (1989)
Anderson Bruford Wakeman HoweI’ve been a Yes fan since my pre-teens, before I knew what progressive rock was. They were just another amazing band writing really cool extended songs with stellar musicianship & lyrics I could never decipher. By 1983 they had modernized their sound after another round of personnel changes and had the biggest hit of their career. I loved the 90125 album as much as anything in their catalog, but by the end of the decade I longed for a return to their classic prog sound. With “Yes” still controlled by one version of the band, four members of their classic-years lineup (Jon Anderson, Bill Bruford, Rick Wakeman and Steve Howe) started an offshoot entity that was Yes in all but the name. Bruford’s affinity for electronic percussion aside, the ABWH album is an incredible collection that bridges ‘70s Yes with a more updated sonic sheen. Some fans might not be able to get past the production (which explains why I’ve seen it so often in the budget bins) but I’ve adored this album since the first time I played it. I’m also fortunate to have a poster of the album art signed by artist Roger Dean, framed on the wall to my right as I type this. It’s an album that should be listened to in its entirety, but “Brother Of Mine” (which was edited into a radio-friendly version) is the perfect entry point for the uninitiated.

 

Artist: TOY MATINEE
Album Title/Year Of Release: TOY MATINEE (1990)
Toy MatineeThis is one of those records that came & went pretty quickly, and if you missed that brief window of opportunity you’ve probably never even heard of it. Fortunately I have a few friends who also love it, and I’ve learned via the internet that Toy Matinee has a relatively small but very loyal following. Formed by songwriter/producer Patrick Leonard, best known for his collaborations with Madonna, as a showcase for his progressive art-rock leanings, the real star of this album is singer/multi-instrumentalist Kevin Gilbert. The two of them, along with a cast of musicians including bassist Guy Pratt (best known for his work with Pink Floyd & David Gilmour) and Gilmour-esque guitarist Tim Pierce, crafted a collection of songs that run the gamut from spacey Pink Floyd soundscapes to melodic art-pop that recalls artists like 10cc, The Alan Parsons Project and Little River Band. They only released this one album before Gilbert pursued a solo career (which was cut short by his death at the age of 29, in 1996). A few years later Leonard tried to recapture the magic with former Mr. Mister frontman Richard Page in the similarly named 3rd Matinee, and although it’s a very good album I’ve never felt as passionate about it as I do with Toy Matinee. I adore every song on the record, none more so than “The Ballad Of Jenny Ledge,” which is the ideal introduction to their music.

 

Artist: LITTLE VILLAGE
Album Title/Year Of Release: LITTLE VILLAGE (1992)
Little VillageI discovered the music of John Hiatt via his 1988 album Slow Turning, unaware that he had been a recording artist for nearly 15 years at that point. I began my slow trip backwards through his discography with the preceding album, 1987’s Bring The Family, and that’s still the gold standard of his catalog for me. The musicians on that album (Nick Lowe on bass, Ry Cooder on guitar and the ubiquitous Jim Keltner on drums) brought a distinctly subtle mood to a collection of Hiatt songs that ranks among his best. Needless to say I was excited when the foursome formed a band a few years later, this time including songs by Cooder & Lowe. There was no way it could live up to the greatness of Bring The Family, but once I got past those expectations I discovered a number of gems, and when I played it last week for the first time in several years I enjoyed it more than ever. The songs are a little more playful this time, with titles like “Solar Sex Panel,” “Do You Want My Job” and “Don’t Bug Me When I’m Working” indicating that the writing & recording sessions must have been fun for all involved. The key track for me has always been “Don’t Think About Her When You’re Trying To Drive,” Hiatt’s incredible ballad that features all four musicians in peak form.

 

Artist: COVERDALE PAGE
Album Title/Year Of Release: COVERDALE PAGE (1993)
Coverdale PageIt’s no secret that Led Zeppelin has been my favorite band since I was 13 years old, and I’ve always gravitated to anything the band members have done since they split in 1980 following the death of drummer John Bonham. Jimmy Page hasn’t been terribly prolific over the years, releasing the Death Wish II soundtrack in 1982, two albums with Paul Rodgers as The Firm in 1985 & 1986, and his only solo album (Outrider) in 1988. When he paired up with former Deep Purple/Whitesnake singer David Coverdale (who was often derided for being a Robert Plant clone) many fans scoffed, but they missed out on what I consider to be the most Zeppelin-esque work that Page has done. The songwriting (with a couple of exceptions) is fantastic, and his guitar playing is as inspired as I’ve ever heard it. Coverdale was still in his prime, hitting all those high notes effortlessly. The secret weapon, though, is drummer Denny Carmassi (best known for his work with Montrose and Heart), who captures Bonham’s unique mixture of power, technique & swing like no one else I’ve ever heard. They cover a lot of musical ground, with power ballads (“Take Me For A Little While”), massive bluesy rockers (“Whisper A Prayer For The Dying”) and syncopated radio-friendly tunes (“Shake My Tree”). Ignore this album at your own risk.

 

Artist: THE GRAYS
Album Title/Year Of Release: RO SHAM BO (1994)
The Grays - Ro Sham BoThe subgenre known as “power pop” started with bands like Badfinger, Big Star & The Raspberries, who combined the melodic genius of The Beatles, The Kinks, The Hollies, etc. with power chords and stomping drums. Many artists have carried on this tradition, from Cheap Trick to The Knack, The Romantics to The Smithereens. One of the greatest power pop acts was the short-lived Jellyfish, who I was fortunate to see on both of their tours before they split up in ’93. The guitarist on their first album and tour, Jason Falkner, has since become one of my favorite singer-songwriters, and my initial introduction to his music came via this one-off collaboration with fellow songwriters Jon Brion (best known for collaborations with Aimee Mann and Fiona Apple) and Buddy Judge, along with drummer Dan McCarroll. All three writers deliver some stellar melodic tunes, with Falkner’s having the biggest impact on me. Album opener “Very Best Years” is as good a place to start as any.

 

Artist: ERNIE ISLEY
Album Title/Year Of Release: HIGH WIRE (1990)
Ernie Isley - High WireOne of the younger siblings in the Isley family, Ernie Isley wasn’t part of the initial Isley Brothers success, but when he officially joined the group in the early ‘70s his impact was immediate & huge. Having learned to play guitar from family friend Jimi Hendrix, Ernie acted as Hendrix’s disciple, adding his fiery playing to many of their smooth soul & funk-rock songs. For his only solo album, he shone a light on all aspects of his musical personality, with soulful vocals, guitar heroics and (most importantly) memorable, melodic songs. Some might be turned off by the synthetic rhythms on many of the tracks but it never sounds plastic or robotic. This is another album where just about every song is a winner, from the bouncy title track to the slow-burning “Love Situation” and guitar masterclass of “Rising From The Ashes.” I consider myself very fortunate to have seen Ernie at a small club in New York City when he supported this album.

 

Artist: GTR
Album Title/Year Of Release: GTR (1986)
GTR (Hackett & Howe)Ah, the mid’80s. For many music fans this was the nadir, a vast wasteland of drum machines, Fairlight synthesizers and all-around sterile productions. Having been a teenager & in my early 20s during that decade I had no problem with those sonic choices, but I also admit that many recordings from that time have aged more poorly than the music of just about any other era. In some cases, however, the production flourishes couldn’t take away from the performances, and the sole album by GTR is an example of that. A collaboration between former Yes/Asia guitarist Steve Howe and former Genesis guitarist Steve Hackett, they embraced modern technology but surrounded themselves with musicians (drummer Jonathan Mover and bassist Phil Spaulding) and a vocalist (Max Bacon) who kept their melodic prog/pop songs grounded. This album isn’t for everyone, but if you like the slightly bombastic nature of Asia’s prog/pop hybrid from a few years earlier, you would find a lot to like here. “When The Heart Rules The Mind” was a Top 20 hit and, with a little more promotion, songs like “The Hunter” and “Imagining” could have had similar success. GTR is a rare example of an album that sounds dated & timeless in equal measure.

 

There will be at least a couple more entries in this series since I have so many one-album artists to revisit & discuss. Please let me know if you’re a fan of one or more of the albums listed above, and tell me about any similar records that have made a big impact on you. Perhaps some of those will be addressed in one of my upcoming posts.

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51 comments on “ONE AND DONE – My Favorite One-Album Artists Part 1

  1. danicapiche
    November 1, 2014

    Wow, thanks for this post Rich! Especially for “Shake My Tree”. I don’t remember hearing it before. I’ll make my way to the others, but right now I’m still on that one 🙂

    Like

    • Thanks so much for checking this out, Danica. Glad you’re enjoying that Coverdale Page song. It’s a shame that album isn’t more highly regarded.

      Best…
      Rich

      Liked by 1 person

      • danicapiche
        November 1, 2014

        That’s a mystery. Did they have no management or promotions people? Not that it should need much promoting….

        Like

      • They had plenty of promotion. I remember most of the big music stores in NYC had huge displays for Coverdale Page leading up to the album’s release. The fact that they didn’t tour in the US probably worked against them, and within a year Page was working with Plant again. Much as I enjoyed that, I wish Coverdale & Page made more music together.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. mikeladano
    November 1, 2014

    Nice read, Rich. An interesting concept for a series as well! Blind Faith, yup, can’t argue with that. Coverdale-Page is a great, bold selection. ABWH too. I’ve often wondered why it seems to get a bad rap. I didn’t think it was that bad at all!

    Like

    • Thanks Mike. Glad you like the concept for this series. I couldn’t decide on my next artist and I’m a little short on time right now, so this seemed like a good chance to revisit some albums I know pretty well and highlight them for people who may not be aware of them.

      Like

  3. 1537
    November 1, 2014

    Toy Matinee, Little Village, The Grays? surely you’re making them up!

    Like

  4. "Vinyl Connection"
    November 1, 2014

    I’m with other comment-makers: great idea. Has me bustling to my spreadsheet.
    Of those you listed, I know about half. Reckon you are being VERY generous to GTR!
    I love The La’s too, and John Power’s subsequent band Cast.

    Like

    • As I mentioned, GTR isn’t for everyone, and I think you had to be a fan at the time in order to appreciate it. It would probably sound VERY dated to anyone hearing it for the first time now. Glad you agree about The La’s, and I concur about Cast. Great band.

      Like

  5. newmancan
    November 1, 2014

    GTR! One of my regrets in selling CDs (for new ones) GTR was an unfortunate victim. Could get it on Amazon but I want to find it again as penance. Glad to see you mention them. Maybe not a great album overall but enjoyable for sure.

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    • I think the GTR album might have been reissued in recent years on CD. Should be easy to find that or the original. Not sure which one sounds better. I’m happy with the copy I bought in ’86.

      Like

  6. wardo
    November 1, 2014

    I find it interesting that so many of these come from the early ’90s — a time when I was much more receptive to “one and done” bands! Good call on the Grays; I think they opened for Toad the Wet Sprocket on their one tour. And of course, that La’s album is fantastic.

    Like

    • Hi Wardo. Thanks for stopping by. I noticed that the majority of my choices here were from the early-’90s. I was really expanding my horizons at the time, and it also helped that I had been working in the music industry for a few years by then so I had a lot of connections and got to hear many new artists. Not sure what eras my next set of choices will come from, but there’s little doubt that the mid-’80s through mid-’90s will be well represented. Consider yourself fortunate to have seen The Grays. I’ve seen Falkner several times but not The Grays. I wasn’t a Toad The Wet Sprocket fan at the time but I’ve since gained an appreciation for them. I’m sure that was a fantastic show.

      Like

  7. Robin
    November 1, 2014

    Great call on Blind Faith. I forgot it was a “One and Done” as you said.

    Like

    • Thanks, Robin. Blind Faith may be on of the earliest one-and-done artists. It’s a shame that they never gave it another shot, but at least they left behind one classic album.

      Like

  8. Bill Van Orden
    November 1, 2014

    Thank you, Rich…for my introduction to TOY MATINEE. The selection above sounds like an undiscovered cut by Steely Dan in a way. Just sayin’. I’m going to have to seek this one out for some more ear candy.

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    • Bill, I can’t tell you how much it pleases me that you love this Toy Matinee song. I think you will find plenty more incredible music on that album once you get your hands on it, and you’ll likely find it for a very reasonable price. Please let me know your thoughts after you get it. Thanks. Enjoy the rest of the weekend.

      Like

  9. Lewis Johnston
    November 2, 2014

    A lot of good music to be had there, it is pretty surprising how many of these one album artists/groups are surprisingly good. A lot of these I know but there are some I don’t so I will be investigating those when I get the chance. The Rockpile album always brings back good memories, had the pleasure of seeing them live which was a great gig. Always reminds me of the tail end of the Stiff records era which was great fun, still have the first release on that label. So It Goes by Nick Lowe.

    Like

    • Hi Lewis. It IS amazing how many of these one-and-done artists made such a big impact with such little output. I also love that Stiff Records era, and it’s very cool that you still own “So It Goes.” I have most of Lowe’s studio albums as well as the excellent 4-CD box set called The Doings. I also have a few Dave Edmunds albums & compilations, one excellent Billy Bremner album (Bash!), most of the Man albums (featuring Terry Williams on drums) and the Carlene Carter album I mentioned in this post. Needless to say, the Rockpile family tree has deep roots in my collection.

      Cheers!
      Rich

      Like

  10. Phillip Helbig
    November 2, 2014

    “For many music fans this was the nadir, a vast wasteland of drum machines, Fairlight synthesizers and all-around sterile productions. “

    Indeed. Even Joni Mitchell had a Fairlight. Jethro Tull’s Under Wraps is their worst album. (Ironically, the one before, Broadsword and the Beast, which by coincidence I listened to last night on the way to and from a concert by the excellent The Musical Box, had many 80’s synthesizers etc. but integrated them really well with flute, mandolin, electric and acoustic guitars etc.) David Gilmour’s second solo album suffers the same fate.

    An additional reason to admire Iron Maiden is that they were not affected by this at all. Their most classic albums are from the 1980s, but as far as production they sound very 1970s, which is A Good Thing. By the way, we are looking forward to your series on Maiden. You think you know them too well? When did you last listen to the two Blaze albums? Iron Maiden is a band where there is no bad album and several good ones. I confess a liking for the Blaze albums.

    I recently saw Blaze, Paul Di’Anno, Maiden UniteD (a Dutch-English unplugged Maiden cover band with the outstanding Damian Wilson on vocals—if Bruce ever retires, Steve should give him a call), and Thomas Zwijsens (Dutchman who plays Maiden arranged for classical guitar). Di’Anno was everything I don’t like about music. Blaze was excellent. I might even check out some of his solo stuff.

    Like

    • Hi Phillip. Although I agree that the ’80s production sound didn’t always bring out the best in many artists, I feel differently about that Tull album, which I think of as an offshoot of Ian’s Walk Into Light LP. I like that he/they were trying different things and trying to stay current. Although Under Wraps is clearly tied to its era, there are some excellent songs and Ian sounds just as engaged in that material as he did with their earlier classics.

      I will eventually get to the Iron Maiden catalog, possibly as early as the first part of 2015, but I have a few others I want to revisit first. I wasn’t much of a fan of the Blaze era and I eventually got rid of those albums. I will have to re-purchase them or borrow a friend’s copies whenever I cover their catalog. It’s true that their catalog avoided the pitfalls of ’80s production, most likely because of producer Martin Birch. It also helped that they were a new band that wasn’t aiming for chart success, so they didn’t need to chase current trends. Some of the biggest offenders were older artists who were willing to do whatever it took to stay relevant in the new decade.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Phillip Helbig
        November 3, 2014

        Maybe I’ll listen to Under Wraps again. Amazingly in retrospect, it took me several plays to get into Stormwatch, which I now really like (especially Ian Anderson’s(!) bass playing).

        I can understand if one prefers Bruce to Blaze, but his albums are nowhere near enough to get rid of them. And you actually got rid of albums? A friend of mine used to have a closet into which he banned things he was no longer into. The last time I checked he was a big Zappa fan, but moving into Norwegian jazz. In this closet were albums by Kiss and Chris de Burgh. 🙂

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      • Not sure I realized that Ian played bass on Stormwatch, but it’s not surprising considering how talented he is. I’ve always enjoyed that album. I’m surprised it took you a while to get into it. Hopefully the same will happen with Under Wraps, although I understand why the synthetic sounds would turn off a lot of fans.

        Every once in a while I will purge some CDs & LPs from my collection, more so since I started ripping my CDs to a hard drive about 10 years ago, but it’s very rare & only a small percentage of my collection.

        Like

  11. 45spin
    November 2, 2014

    Another fantastic post, Interesting enough a lot of them are what we would call “Super Groups” in that they came from other notable bands to make their epic supergroup album. Rockpile, The Grays, Blind Faith, Little Village, ANDERSON BRUFORD WAKEMAN HOWE, COVERDALE PAGE, GTR, yep they all had some fame and success before their supergroup apperance and you are totally right that they all eneded up making some pretty damn good records. Hmm…… now the real question is “Why did they break up”

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    • Hi Rob. Some people might dispute the “supergroup” description for a lot of these bands but it’s true that they often came from other bands, some better known than others. The only reasonable explanations for why they broke up are the weight of expectation and huge egos. Of course, in the case of ABWH, they just morphed back into Yes with the other version of the group, and recorded the much-maligned but still quite excellent “Union” LP.

      In looking at my master list of one-and-done artists, there are a decent number of this type of artist but many are solo projects, side projects and artists that simply didn’t last long. I’m having a lot of fun giving some of these a listen again and writing about them. Glad you enjoyed it as well. Thanks for stopping by.

      Like

      • Daddydinorawk
        November 3, 2014

        The Onion album itself isn’t half bad, (but it ain’t half good either). However the tour was amazing. Agree with you on Under Wraps however. Always felt the album was strong, unified and clear. Truly a one off, I didn’t feel the same about Walk Into Light. Always wanted Ian to have Doane Perry record some live drums for Wraps, but I don’t think he’s really that fond of a certain kind of revisionism. Anyways I think many of the 80’s albums I love at the core have that dryness, that air of the Age of Plastic. Digital Dust!

        Listening to Kevin Gilbert. Truly a sad and tragic loss. He could have been the American Steven Wilson. Alas….

        Like

      • I always find it amusing when people replace “Union” with “Onion.” I had a friend who used to refer to the Black Sabbath “Reunion” live album as “Re-onion” and it always made me laugh. That Yes album wasn’t as good as ABWH but I still love it. I think the Rabin tracks are the strongest. The tour was phenomenal. So glad I witnessed it, and I was thrilled when they finally released a CD/DVD document a few years ago so I can relive it whenever I want.

        I’m glad Ian hasn’t succumbed to revisionist history when it comes to his earlier work. The closest he’s been to that is utilizing Steven Wilson to remix those classic albums, but since Wilson has amazingly sympathetic ears it would have been a shame if they didn’t work together.

        Very true about Kevin Gilbert. He was immensely talented, and he was getting into mixing/engineering as well as creating phenomenal music. I believe he did some mixing for Spock’s Beard’s second album. Toy Matinee is still my favorite thing he worked on, but I also love his earlier band Giraffe as well as his various solo albums and posthumous releases.

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  12. danicapiche
    November 3, 2014

    Hi again, Rich. I’ve stopped hitting replay on Coverdale Page long enough to read your last paragraph. Would you consider including Derek and the Dominos as well as the Sex Pistols in this series? I’d be interested in your review and discussion, as well as those of your readers.

    Like

    • Hi Danica. I’m glad you were able to pry your eyes away from the Coverdale-Page clip and read the rest of this post. Haha. I can guarantee that both of those artists will be included in this series, one of them in the next post. Stay tuned….

      Hope you had a nice weekend.
      Rich

      Liked by 1 person

      • danicapiche
        November 3, 2014

        Awesome! Thank you! You made my day, Rich 🙂 Prying my eyes away was no easy task haha. Thanks again for the gold mine that is your blog. It’s a labor of love that I always appreciate. I hope you also had a good weekend and that your week is starting well.

        Like

      • I really appreciate the kind words. Glad you can see what a labor of love this blog is for me, and I know you approach your writing the same way. If it ever becomes a chore I’ll have to move on, but my music collection is filled with great music that will hopefully inspire me to keep writing about it, a little bit at a time.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Daddydinorawk
    November 3, 2014

    Ahh what a great idea for a series. You have done it again my friend!! Sitting here looking thru things trying to find those one off’s. I’m grasping at straws here. Notting Hillbillies? Mother Love Bone? 3(ELP wih out the L? the 101’ers? (Do posthumous collections count?) Man I don’t even know if I would qualify those but they do fit the loose theme. How about the League of Gentlemen, Manzanera/McKay, Wetton/Manzanera? Ha, I’m having loads of fun with this.

    Have you noticed a similarity between the Toy Matinee album and Donald Fagen’s Kamkiriad?

    Like

    • Glad you enjoyed this post, Daddydinorawk. Sorry to say that none of the artists you mentioned will be included in this series. I would have included 801 Live (which would get Manzanera a mention) since I was under the impression that they only released that album, but I recently learned that they had a studio album as well. I have Notting Hillbillies and 3 but they were never among my favorites. Maybe I’ll revisit them soon and included them in a later post.

      Not sure I hear a Toy Matinee – Kamakiriad connection, other than the incredible musicianship shared between the two. I hear so many influences on Toy Matinee but they’ve never sounded like anyone but themselves. Too bad they only did that one album.

      Like

      • Daddydinorawk
        November 4, 2014

        I inadvertently posted that before I was done, was going to include Random Hold and Quiet Sun (both performed on by 801 bassist Bill McCormick) and another Fripp one off Sunday All Over The World (not to mention Sylvian/Fripp, which was also bloody stunning live). So many one offs, so little time.

        Looking forward to what you will unearth on the hopefully upcoming editions.

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      • I might have one David Sylvian project in this series, but I’ll see how things progress. I will probably only write about 3 or 4 of these posts this month before moving on to something else, and maybe I’ll return to it somewhere down the line. I agree that there are more of these one-and-done projects than I expected, and every day I realize another one that I missed when I initially went through my list.

        Like

  14. Lewis Johnston
    November 3, 2014

    Toy Matinee is something I will definitely be looking to get, was very impressed with what I have heard, always nice to find something new. Thanks again Rich.

    Like

    • That’s great, Lewis. I am so pleased to be spreading the word about Toy Matinee. It’s a magnificent album from top-to-bottom and I’m sure you’ll find a lot to like. It might open up a small can of worms, though, as Kevin Gilbert released some seriously great records before his death in ’96. Also, I’m not sure if you have a surround sound set-up, but if so there’s a DTS-Audio DVD edition of Toy Matinee which is stunning.

      Like

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  18. danicapiche
    December 29, 2014

    Hi Rich,

    I’ve found my way to Toy Matinee. I took the scenic route the other day from your Year In Review 2012 post (via Giraffe). In this One and Done post, the Coverdale-Page discovery eclipsed everything else for me.

    In case you haven’t already seen this, you may be interested in: Toy Matinee Unplugged Pt. 1 http://youtu.be/p667zpl0gFM

    Danica

    Like

    • Thanks Danica. I’ve seen those Toy Matinee unplugged performances. There’s a newly released unplugged CD that I just ordered along with a performance of Genesis’ “The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway” by Giraffe. Yep, I’m an obsessive fan. is there any other kind? Haha.

      Liked by 1 person

      • danicapiche
        December 29, 2014

        And here I was hoping I’d be able to bring you something new. Silly me 🙂

        I was hearing a bit of Simon & Garfunkel as well as Phil Collins, and his background explains it.

        The performance art aspect is interesting and original at the time. It makes you wonder how Gilbert’s music would have evolved, past 1996.

        Like

      • I appreciate you forwarding that link. There’s so much out there that I’m amazed I had actually seen those videos.. I’m biased, but Gilbert was so talented that I think he would have been a major artist on the progressive rock scene and possibly beyond. His death was a huge loss that, sadly, only a limited number of music fans were impacted by.

        Liked by 1 person

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