KamerTunesBlog

Revisiting my extensive music collection, one artist at a time

XTC Part 4 – Dukes And Kings…For A Day

Bookending the exquisite Skylarking album, which I discussed in my previous post, XTC released an EP & an LP that showcased their love for late-60s psychedelic “nuggets.” Since the majority of these XTC Photo - The Dukes Of Stratosphear 1“original” songs were more of an homage or outright copy of existing music, as opposed to being merely influenced by them, they decided these records wouldn’t make sense coming from XTC so they billed themselves as The Dukes Of Stratosphear instead. They each adopted a typically ridiculous pseudonym: Sir John Johns (Andy Partridge), The Red Curtain (Colin Moulding), Lord Cornelius Plum (Dave Gregory) and E.I.E.I. Owen (Dave’s brother, Ian Gregory on drums). Even producer John Leckie, who helmed the first two XTC albums, chose the name Swami Anand Nagara. Using mostly vintage equipment and trying to stick with a one-or-two-takes-per-song philosophy, they effectively (re-)captured the sound of that era. Also, Andy Partridge’s art direction was a perfect complement to the music. Just check out those trippy album covers.

For their debut EP, 25 O’Clock (1985), it’s all killer & no filler. Andy described opening track “25 O’Clock” as “all doom-laden nonsense poetry & doomier chords,” but it’s not nearly as dark as XTC - 25 O'Clock (The Dukes Of Stratosphear)that. Taking a cue from The Electric Prunes, they use a huge bass sound, swirling organ & phased vocals to set the tone for what’s to come. Dave delivers a searing guitar solo that I had previously overlooked. The deeper I get into their catalog the more I’m convinced that he’s an unheralded guitar hero. “Bike Ride To The Moon” mixes Syd Barrett-era Pink Floyd with The Move, and those pitch-shifting vocals recall David Bowie’s “The Laughing Gnome.” It’s probably the silliest song here, but maybe the most fun as well. “My Love Explodes” immediately brought to mind The Yardbirds, which is what they were going for. It really swings while also incorporating bits of Eastern sitar-based psychedelia. Colin’s sole contribution, “What In The World?,” is a great one. It’s clearly a Beatles homage (mostly songs like “Only A Northern Song” and “Rain”), with McCartney-esque bass, and a cool hook each time he sings a year (“2032” through “2035”). “Your Gold Dress” is the one slight misstep, although I love the piano-led section (“Vibrations are coming my way”). “The Mole From The Ministry” is another Beatles take-off, this time going into “I Am The Walrus” territory. I love the deep, squishy vocals in the intro.

The expanded CD version, which was released in 2009, includes demos for four of the songs, plus two additional demos and one recently-recorded song: “Open A Can Of Human Beans.” Recorded for a multiple sclerosis charity album, it actually featured all four of “The Dukes” years after XTC stopped playing together, with up to three of them in the studio at one time. It sounds less like a particular song or band and more of a modern take on an old sound, but it fits in nicely as a well-selected bonus track.

For their one & only full-length album, Psonic Psunspot (1987), The Dukes spent a little more time (and money) on recording and expanded their influences beyond purely psychedelic. Colin’s XTC - Psonic Psunspot (The Dukes Of Stratosphear)“Vanishing Girl” is a Hollies tribute that sounds more like the early- to mid-‘60s. There’s a great guitar figure and I love the close beat group harmonies. I should like “Have You Seen Jackie?,” which recalls Syd Barrett, but it’s a little too jokey & weird to stand up to repeated listening. “Little Lighthouse” was rejected by producer Todd Rundgren for Skylarking, so they gave it a late-60s West Coast treatment (especially those horns, which had me thinking of the band Love) and made it a Dukes song. “You’re A Good Man Albert Brown (Curse You Red Barrel)” is one of those British sing-along pub songs that were popularized by The Kinks & The Small Faces, among others. Written about Andy’s grandfather & his wife (none of the references refer to her as his grandmother), it’s “knees up” fun with barrelhouse piano & a stomping drum beat. They turn to John Lennon for inspiration on “Collideascope,” which moves along slowly with sparsely strummed acoustic guitar & a thick bass line. The big hook comes at “wakey, wakey, wakey little sleeper.”

“You’re My Drug” is clearly indebted to The Byrds, but it’s so infectious that it has its own unique charm (especially the Latin cabasa, the driving percussion heard throughout the track). For Colin’s “Shiny Cage,” Andy explained that “we decided…to make it sound like every track from Rubber Soul smashed into one” (I’ve also seen him reference another Beatles masterpiece, Revolver), and it’s an apt description. I especially love Colin’s super British vocals at “Well the sun’s getting higher, think I’ll take a flyer…”). XTC Photo - The Dukes Of Stratosphear 2“Brainiac’s Daughter” is a McCartney-esque piano piece about the supposed daughter of the titular comic book villain. Andy’s fantastic vocals, especially his falsetto, deserve special mention. Colin’s “The Affiliated” is a song that they all agree doesn’t feel like a Dukes song, but I don’t think it’s out of place. It’s a more grounded, “real people” song that goes into a lounge/jazz section and features a typically tasteful guitar solo. “Pale And Precious” is a stunning ode to post-Pet Sounds Beach Boys. Sure, it might even be a blatant rip-off, but that’s pretty much the idea of The Dukes Of Stratosphear. Andy plays the drums in the “up she rises each & every morning” section, and my favorite part is the multi-layered harmonies at “fade away, ah-ah, fade away.” The six demos included on the expanded CD are all songs included on the album, so there are no additional tracks. They’re all enjoyable but don’t add anything to an already excellent album.

Following Psonic Psunspot, they closed the book on The Dukes, retaining some of the psychedelic trappings for a collection of new songs under the XTC name, Oranges & Lemons (1989). As I’ve stated before, this was my first foray into the world of XTC and it continues to be my favorite. I wasn’t sure if spending so much time XTC - Oranges & Lemonswith their prior releases would affect my opinion, but it holds up incredibly well and I still love just about every song. The recording process, which took place in LA with noted remixer/novice producer Paul Fox, was long & tedious but you wouldn’t know it from the joy that emanates from the disc. Just looking at that day-glo, Yellow Submarine-inspired album cover you know it’s going to be a lighthearted journey, and even with a running time of more than an hour over its 15 tracks, it never feels too long. Since I have so many good things to say about Oranges & Lemons, addressing every song, I’ll start with Colin’s 3 contributions. “King For A Day” was a minor radio hit that isn’t a favorite of the band, but I think it’s an off-kilter gem about people’s constant quest for fame & fortune. The backing vocals (“we’re living…no giving”) are unique, and the slick production & overall left-field pop sound reminds me of the band Toy Matinee, whose one & only brilliant album was released the following year. “One Of The Millions” is Colin’s song to himself “for not speaking out” more. It has a slight sea shanty feel and chiming, circular guitar. I love the overlapped vocals at “never seem to do anything,” the dense arrangement and the melodic hook at “so I won’t rock the boat ‘cause I’m scared what might happen.” “Cynical Days” is one of only a couple of songs that hasn’t held up for me. Despite the title, it’s more about the melancholy feel than any cynicism in the lyrics. The music is a little formless compared to what he usually delivers, but I really enjoy the jazzy section that recalls contemporary artists like Simply Red & Everything But The Girl.

XTC Photo (from Oranges & Lemons CD)
The rest of Oranges And Lemons belongs to Andy, and he’s at the top of his game as he celebrates the birth of his son as well as his satisfaction over the band finally getting some notoriety in America. “Garden of Earthly Delights” is a swirling, Middle Eastern psychedelic fanfare/overture of which Andy said, “I wanted it to sound like a Persian rug.” The groove is programmed but it still feels loose, and Andy’s falsetto is great. “The Mayor Of Simpleton” was the biggest hit from the album, and even though Andy was “rather embarrassed by its simplicity,” I think that’s part of the charm. Not every song needs to be a complicated, multi-movement extravaganza. This is simply a perfect pop song with amazing verses & choruses and a brilliant bridge. “Here Comes President Kill Again” is slower, with a military drum pattern and impressive trumpet work from Mark Isham (who appears throughout the album). Based on the book Travels in Nihilon (which birthed a song of the same name on Black Sea), Andy said “this is about our powerlessness over governments’ ability to kill,” but it’s a lot more upbeat than that description. “The Loving” has always been a highlight of their catalog for me, so much so that I made sure it was played at my wedding. Lyrically & musically it’s about as happy & positive as they’ve ever been, with a grand statement that could be considered an update of The Beatles’ “All You Need Is Love.” Dave’s brief but melodic guitar solo cements this as a pop classic.

Although Andy has given credit to Captain Beefheart for inspiring “Poor Skeleton Steps Out,” most likely due to the clattering arrangement, I think that’s a loose connection. I love the whistling as well as the backing vocals at “step out step out step out step out.” Andy has stated that “Scarecrow People” is his favorite song on the album, and it’s an excellent choice. It has a clattering sound, as if Tom Waits chose to write a slick yet quirky pop song, and Andy really belts out the line “now aiiiin’t weeee?” “Merely A Man” is about not following leaders, set to a big drum sound & searing guitar while remaining super poppy & upbeat. “Across This Antheap” is carried along by a work-song arrangement, clanging percussion & “hey hey” vocals. It’s densely packed with synth washes & strong harmonies. “Hold Me My Daddy” carries a nice sentiment about connecting with his father, but could also be him projecting his feelings onto his kids. The African “high life” feel of the ending guitar part is a nice addition, and Dave rips off another memorable melodic guitar solo. I used to enjoy “Pink Thing,” which is equally about Andy’s penis & his son, a lot more. It’s still clever & catchy with fantastic guitar work, but now it comes across as somewhat incomplete. “Miniature Sun” is all about Isham’s synth-y trumpet and the gleaming, jazzy vibe. Album closer “Chalkhills And Children” is a lush, gorgeous Beach Boys homage that Andy described as “one of the best things I’ve ever written.” Dave said it’s “a landmark track…if we’re remembered for anything it is this song.” The melody at “Even I never know where I go when my eyes are closed” is fabulous, and it’s a haunting sentiment. Not only is it a perfect way to end a nearly perfect album, but the song is so powerful and definitive that the name of the top XTC-related website was inspired by it: Chalkills.org. I’m so glad that Oranges & Lemons has stood the test of time for me. Even though I get the sense that longtime fans rate this somewhere in the middle of the pack when it comes to their discography, I don’t think they’ve released a more definitive statement. Of course, I still have a few more albums to revisit before I can confirm this.

Rag & Bone Buffet (1990), subtitled Rare Cuts & Leftovers, is an odds-and-sods collection of b-sides, alternate versions, BBC recordings, rejected album tracks & more. In the past I haven’t XTC -Rag & Bone Buffetgiven this CD much attention, with only a handful of tracks making an impression. This week, however, I spent a lot of time with it and, even though it’s a hit-and-miss affair, at least half of its 24 tracks stand up to repeated listening. Those are the ones I’ll discuss here. “Ten Feet Tall” is an electric version of the Drums & Wires track that was re-recorded for a US single release that never happened.  It sounds a little faster than the album version, and it’s a nice alternative. “Mermaid Smiled” is the Skylarking track that got removed so they could include the popular radio hit “Dear God” on that album. There’s a slight hint of The Zombies’ “Tell Her No” in the opening riff, and the rest is a mellow, subtly-played tune (with vibes, congas & acoustic guitar). The slightly ethereal “Heaven Is Paved With Broken Glass” was cut from English Settlement but deserved a better fate. It has a catchy whistle-y melody, and Andy described it as “a song about disappointment…a bit Talking Heads.” Colin’s “The World Is Full Of Angry Young Men” was attempted for Mummer but only Pete Phipps’ drum track remained on this new recording from the Oranges & Lemons era. It’s moody & jazzy, recalling Joe Jackson circa his Night & Day LP.

Two Christmas songs, recorded as The Three Wise Men, show up here and they couldn’t be more different from one another. “Thanks For Christmas” is gorgeous jangly pop that belongs on any definitive pop/rock holiday compilation. Although I haven’t seen many positive things written about it, “Countdown To Christmas Party Time” is an insanely addictive techno dance/funk track that might go on a little too long but had me smiling each time I played XTC Photo (as The Three Wise Men)it. It’s not for everyone, but I love it. A 1987 BBC performance of “Another Satellite,” with a drum machine providing the rhythmic accompaniment, is very good. Colin’s “Officer Blue” is another one that doesn’t seem to be highly rated (Andy described it as one of the two worst songs they’ve ever recorded), but this Black Sea outtake has cool echo-y percussion and fits in nicely with the other songs from that era. A 1979 BBC recording of “Scissor Man” is fantastic, especially the ska/dub vibe that begins at around the 3-minute mark. This is one of those songs that keeps getting better, and has been stuck in my head for quite some time. “Pulsing Pulsing” is a brief, claustrophobic tune with just tom toms, sparse bass & a nifty little guitar figure. Colin’s “Blame The Weather,” the b-side to “Senses Working Overtime,” has decent verses but a super-catchy pop chorus (“You blame the weather, whoah-oh”). Rag & Bone Buffet was clearly compiled for existing fans, so I wouldn’t recommend it as a starting point for an XTC novice.

I’ll return soon to discuss another studio album and a couple of CDs of archive recordings, as well as one other XTC-related project I almost forgot that I owned. Until then, I look forward to hearing what you think of the albums covered here, and I’m curious to find out if anyone else considers Oranges & Lemons their favorite.

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25 comments on “XTC Part 4 – Dukes And Kings…For A Day

  1. mikeladano
    August 1, 2013

    (Still following along quietly)

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    • As always, I appreciate you stopping by. I know how there’s not always something to add to the conversation but it’s still fun to follow along. I’m heading out of town for a few days so I’ll probably have a lot to catch up on at your site when I return.

      Like

      • mikeladano
        August 1, 2013

        Enjoy the weekend then Rich! I look forward to your return in WordPress land.

        Like

      • Thanks. Sometimes its nice to get away for a few days. I could use a break, but I’ll be back in full force by the middle of next week. Have a great weekend as well.

        Like

      • mikeladano
        August 1, 2013

        It’s a long weekend in Canada, so you know I will try! Always good to recharge the batteries.

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  2. uncleb13
    August 2, 2013

    “Oranges & Lemons” is definitely one of my favorite albums by XTC, regardless of that somewhat shrill Paul Fox production and Mr. Mister drummer (he was good for what they needed him to do)! I remember that album came out in late February 1989, and to me, captured perfectly winter’s last gasp, and the promise and awakening that spring brings, even if I was/am here (still) in the good old Midwest USA. Before this I had been a fringe fan of XTC, just owned a “hits” compilation, but somehow was interested and intrigued by the bright psychedelic look of the Geffen ad campaign. It was a classic big, brassy release in the CD era: the production, the artwork, and obviously the lengthy running time. I loved this disc so much, I purchased it on CD, AND on the 3-MiniCD version that came in what was sized like a cigarette pack (regretfully lost in some move in the ’90s). I remember around this time, or a little later, I acquired the Dukes Of Stratosphear comp “Chips From The Chocolate Fireball”, making all the psychedelic influences sensical, which also opened my young-ish mind to the expansive world of “Nuggets” (another musical life changer). I then went backward and forward through the whole XTC catalog and consider them one of the gems of my musical canon. Thanks for shedding some light on their catalog, and so many others!

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    • I’m happy to hear that you love Oranges & Lemons as much as I do. I never had a problem with Paul Fox’s production. It’s definitely “of its time” but works for the brightness of the songs. As for the drummer, Pat Mastelotto has turned out to be pretty great, having played with King Crimson for a number of years. I know he was best known for his work with Mr. Mister when O&L came out, but as you said he did what they needed him to do. I love (and agree with) your sentiment about how that album captured the beginning of spring. I still feel that way every time I play it, no matter the season.

      I also own Chips From The Chocolate Fireball, but that comp was rendered obsolete by the 2009 expanded reissues. I had questioned at the time whether I needed the upgrade, but I’m really glad I got them. The packaging, liner notes, sound quality & bonus tracks made them a worthwhile purchase.

      Thanks so much for stopping by and sharing your thoughts. The whole reason I started this blog, other than to document my re-discovery of the lesser-played albums & artists already in my collection, was the start conversations with other music lovers. I hope you’ll share any insights or stories on past or future posts, if any of them are of interest to you.

      Enjoy the weekend.

      Rich

      Like

  3. ianbalentine
    August 2, 2013

    Oranges and Lemons alternates with Skylarking as my favorite XTX album, today thanks to your post it’s back on top!
    Question for MIKE: What Canadian holiday? I lived there for 18 years but have been back in the States so long I’ve forgot…

    E

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    • mikeladano
      August 2, 2013

      Hey there! It’s called Civic Holiday or Heritage Day depending on the province. All the provinces get it except Quebec as far as I know!

      Like

    • Nice to know I’m not the only one who loved Oranges & Lemons. I’d have to agree now that Skylarking is just as consistent, but I have more of a connection to O&L because it was the first album of theirs I bought.

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  4. ianbalentine
    August 2, 2013

    Thanks, Mike. Hey, also love your blog, well done. Noticed a couple posts on Rush, did you hear they’ve remixed and will be re-releasing Vapour Trails the end of September? I for one am pretty stoked, always thought the original quite muddy…http://www.superdeluxeedition.com/news/rush-vapor-trails-remixed-the-studio-albums-7cd-box-set/
    E

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    • mikeladano
      August 2, 2013

      Hey thanks! Yes I heard about this release, it’s on my want list now! Cheers.

      Like

      • I was thrilled to hear about the upcoming Rush reissues. I worked at Atlantic when they signed there, so I have a special connection to Presto (which is my favorite of their post-Mercury years, with Clockwork Angels a close second). All of those original CDs pressed in the late 80s and early 90s sound good but I could use a sonic upgrade. One of my prized possessions is a framed lithograph of the Feedback artwork signed by all three guys and designer Hugh Syme. As for Vapor Trails, based on the few songs that were remixed for a compilation a few years ago, the album should sound a lot better once it’s “cleaned up.” However, I believe the guy who did the remixing on those tracks is not the same one who worked on the remix of the whole album. It’s definitely a good time to be a Rush fan, with them still on top of their game, recording & touring and getting inducted into the usually ridiculous Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame.

        Okay, it’s time for me to return to my vacation. I had a few free minutes on the computer and I wanted to join in the conversation. Have a great weekend, and happy whichever Canadian holiday you’re celebrating, Mike

        Like

      • mikeladano
        August 2, 2013

        You are correct Rich. Rich Chycki (who I believe also did their 5.1 mixes) did the two on Retrospective III. The new remixes are being done by Dave Motrill. Whether he is remixing the whole album, or just the whole album minus the two Chycki songs, I don’t know.

        Either way it is a compulsory purchase for me.

        Have a great vacation Rich!

        Like

  5. Neal
    August 3, 2013

    Lets face it. Most XTC material just keeps giving and giving.

    Like

  6. sally
    August 5, 2013

    Thanks,enjoyed reading this.I really love the period from 25 o’clock to Nonsuch in XTC’s output.It seemed like each new record was even better than the one before.Oranges and Lemons got great reviews in the British music press but hardly any airplay.radio stations at that time just would not play an XTC single however good it was.I thought Mayor of Simpleton was the catchiest single they had ever released at the time,those gorgeous harmonies on the I love you section sent goosebumps up my spine,still do and that bass line as the song fades was magical.I remember there was a 12″ version of King For a Day that had lots of brass added that was interesting but not as good as the 7″.worth hearing once at least if you can track it down.I thought Paul Fox did a great production job on the album with one exception and I know it’s one of your favourites but The Loving is just too shrill and brash to my ears anyway.lastly I remember being slightly disappointed in the lp packaging for Oranges and Lemons that it wasn’t a gatefold or coloured vinyl like the previous Dukes album.

    Like

    • Hi Sally. I really appreciate you sharing your thoughts on this era of their career, and I apologize for the delay in replying. I just got back from a much needed mini vacation. I agree that “Mayor Of Simpleton” is the catchiest single they’ve ever released, and the most commercial. Not sure why it wasn’t an even bigger hit, but at least here in the US it put them on the map even more than “Dear God” had done a few years earlier. I don’t think I’ve ever heard the 12″ version, but I will definitely seek it out. I’m sure it can be found somewhere on the internet. I was surprised to hear that you don’t enjoy “The Loving.” It seems like the kind of song that any fan of sunny melodic pop would love. As for the vinyl version, I’ve only ever owned XTC albums on CD, but I agree that Oranges & Lemons seems like an album that deserves a gatefold sleeve. That was probably a record company decision. In my experience, colored vinyl rarely sounds as good as a standard slab of black vinyl, so even though a colorful LP would have looked nice you probably got a better sounding record…which is the important thing, right?

      Thanks again for stopping by. I hope you’ll visit again so we can discuss some of their subsequent releases. My next post should be completed this weekend.

      Best wishes,
      Rich

      Like

      • sally
        November 9, 2013

        Hi again Rich,
        thanks for taking the time to reply.I know what you’re saying but to me The Loving is a bit XTC by numbers sort of reminds me a little of All the World is Love by The Hollies and has the shrillest most painful to listen to vocal from Andy until I can’t own her from Apple Venus but that’s another story

        Like

      • Hi Sally. We may not agree on our favorite songs, but at least we both love this band. “The Loving” has always had a big impact on me but I can understand how the production of it might turn some fans off.

        Hope you’re “loving” the weekend.

        Rich

        Like

  7. Glenn S.
    August 15, 2013

    You can count me as a “longtime” XTC fan who thinks Oranges & Lemons was their peak. That colorful album cover promises a bouquet of riches and that’s exactly what they deliver. I remember being a bit unsure of “The Mayor of Simpleton” when I first heard it but, man, has that one grown on me over the years. Most everything else here I loved the first time and still love today. “Across This Antheap” has always reminded me of “Respectable
    Street” because they both start with a slowed-down quote of the middle section before jumping into the main song. “Chalkhills and Children” seems the culmination of everything they learned being the Dukes of Stratosphear, but with a more personal message. Regarding the “King For A Day” mix mentioned Sally, I’m aware of at least three extended mixes, two from a US CD single and another on an import 3″ single. All of them pump up the brass (or synths?) not to mention the bass. They’re more curiosities than must-hears but worth an occasional spin.

    I could go on and on about what a joy the Dukes material is, but you did a great job of that already so there’s really not much for me to add except that I wish more artists would do this type of thing, in whatever genre influenced them.

    Like

    • Hi Glenn. It’s great to know that a longtime fan like yourself also loves Oranges & Lemons. Based on a lot of the reviews I’ve read online, that doesn’t always seem to be the case, and I wouldn’t be surprised if that was sometimes just posturing on their part because it was a commercial success. You know how fans can be very protective of their favorite artists, and once other people jump on the bandwagon they accuse the artist of selling out. To me, though, a great album is a great album, no matter how many people are into it.

      Your comment about “Chalkhills And Children” is perfectly worded. I wish I had thought of that sentiment. Good job.

      Once again, I’m glad we’re in agreement about the music covered here. You can’t help but feel good when you listen to it, and still be impressed by the intricacy of the songwriting & performances. A band still at their creative peak.

      Thanks again for sharing your thoughts.
      Rich

      Like

  8. Steven St.Thomas
    September 23, 2013

    I just have to disagree with the writer’s take on “Cynical Days” – because that’s just human nature to disagree 🙂

    But honestly, 1989 is where Colin Moulding ups his songwriting craft and takes it further into matching music to sentiment. And “Cynical Days” is where that starts. Each shift in music echoes what the lyrics state, as does his “The Good Things” — both of these songs are absolutely beautiful in taking what the words are saying, and making the music support each thought, each thing stated. 1989 is where Colin Moulding became an amazing songwriter. He was great before this, but he went to another level there. It’s part Broadway, part Pop, a whole bunch of parts. It’s incredibly sophisticated writing (but things like “I Remember the Sun” started heading in that direction anyway.)

    Like

    • Hi Steven. Thanks for your comment. I appreciate your defense of “Cynical Days.” I should point out that I still really like the song, as Oranges And Lemons was my first XTC album and I have a strong connection to the entire record, but compared to most of the other tracks it didn’t hold up as well for me. Most of the albums I write about here are albums I haven’t spent much time with over the years as they’ve gathered dust on the shelf, but this was a rare case where I knew everything on the record extremely well. So instead of really getting to know the songs for the first time, here I was re-evaluating my opinions. I can’t argue with any of your points (especially the part about the “sophisticated songwriting”), but if I have to rank the songs on the album, “Cynical Days” would unfortunately fall near the bottom of the list. When that’s one of my least favorite songs, you know the album is pretty special.

      Again, thanks for stopping by & sharing your thoughts. I always love hearing from other passionate music lovers.

      Best wishes,
      Rich

      Like

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